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My Principal is Following Me on Twitter??

sorry-marketers-you-re-doing-twitter-wrong-report-692a5ff817Last year, while finishing up my Masters in Educational Leadership and Policy at the University of Richmond, one of my assignments was to create a Twitter account (more than complete before taking the class) and start building our own Personal Learning Network, or PLN which I love to expand and grow everyday! I missed the class when everyone set up their Twitter accounts because I was presenting at the FETC Conference, but it was really fun participating in class through Twitter at the airport helping show the power of Twitter. One of my classmates, Sara Luckert, posted a funny article about 17 things you can do while actively monitoring a standardized test, and she also mentioned that she is now being followed by her principal, Dr. Brian Fellows, on Twitter. Adding to that, she said she wants to make sure she maintains a level of professionalism. This really got me thinking. Other than my two years as an ITRT, I’ve never had an immediate supervisor following me on Twitter, Facebook, or other social media platform. Do you think people would act differently through social media if they had their administrators following them? Out in the “real world” I have seen stories of people being fired for things they have posted.  Here is just one article on 17 people who were fired for ways they used Facebook. (Four of the 17 are teachers!)

The way I see it going down the road, I don’t see many of my near future bosses following me.  (Update: My principal is following me this year, and I love it!) I don’t say this as a knock on whomever they may be, but rather these people, more than likely, being a generation of people who aren’t as connected on social media. I also say this hoping social-media4that I am wrong! I welcome them to follow me because I see it as a way to let myself shine in other ways than being observed in the building. My own county’s @HenricoSchools Twitter account is following me as well as my school’s @SandstonElem account that I run. As intimidating as this could be, I really feel this is powerful knowing my own school system is interested in the following the information I am sharing. Knowing the power of it makes me want to lead the way and entice more of my teachers and instructional leaders to become involved in social media in professional ways. Many of my teachers follow me on Instagram and Facebook, and I follow them. I don’t think they are looking at it as me “watching” them, but rather as a way to build our relationship as coworkers. In doing so, I know I am taking the opportunity to show them how I can hold myself to high standards on these platforms in a personal and professional way.

Social-Media3Like it or not, as educators, I think we have to hold ourselves to a little bit of a higher standards than others in public. We’ve all had those interactions with students out in public. As an elementary educator I feel like a rock star seeing kids freak out or get real nervous seeing me in public which is totally different in the way they way they act in the school building! Putting ourselves out there in public on sites like Twitter opens us up to a broader market. It is like being out in public but on a grander scale. I use my same Twitter account (@trockr11) professionally and in my personal life, and I find myself censoring myself on certain topics. As educators, in my opinion, we’re always leading, teaching, and modeling. I’ve always viewed being on any social media as a perfect opportunity to model digital citizenship. As I noted before, I want more of my colleagues to join social media platforms – not only to better themselves, but also to help motivate and engage our students. Although I may not have my elementary students following me, I do have many former students in middle and high school who follow me, and I know the professionalism I hold to whomever sees my posts carries a lot of weight in the way people perceive me as an educator and education in general.

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