The Deadline for AP Research Tasks is Approaching Faster than You Think

The AP Capstone Program consists of two courses, AP Seminar and AP Research, taught by Mr. Towslee and Mr. Zelenak, respectively. For AP Research, students must submit their performance tasks (a written paper and oral presentation) by April 30th. This year, students are doing projects ranging from topics on how exposure to nature affects teens’ to social media’s effects on perceived body image of teenagers.

Seniors Jordanne Rolan and Claire Pokrywka have gotten to a good place with their research, with only two weeks left until their final paper is due. Claire’s research focuses on Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the effect that a physician’s diagnosis of PCOS has on patients over the age of 13. “I feel nervous but excited for my pr…

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Meet FeedMore's CEO Doug Pick

By: Momina Raja

If you want to help out in your Richmond Community, FeedMore is the place to do just that. FeedMore, also known as the Central Virginia Food Bank, is a wonderful organization that prepares, collects, and distributes food to the those in need. It’s a place where my family and I volunteer through programs such as food sorting and Meals on Wheels.

Last month I had the chance to interview FeedMore’s CEO, Doug Pick. Mr. Pick, who has been in this position for seven years now, had plenty of good things to say. From cleaning boats and being a mentor, to working at Capital One and Feedmore, he even gives us insight on what donation items they need most and a typical day at work.

What made you want to become CEO of FeedMore?…

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Red Cross Club is Now at Glen Allen High

Red Cross Club, a new club at Glen Allen High School, focuses on giving blood, helping victims of disasters, and educating people about emergency preparedness and fire prevention. The current officers for the 2018-2019 school year are: Mia Varghese, Nancy Hoang, Anna Liu, and Momina Raja.

This club has over 20 active members and holds meetings on the third Friday of every month in the lecture hall. Students in the club can earn volunteer hours towards graduation for simply attending the meetings! In November of 2018, Jon Reinmuth, a Henrico County Firefighter, came to speak to the club about fire safety and how to prevent fires in homes. The club learned about the types of fires and how to properly put out  fire. In January of 2019, the …

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There’s a New Superintendent in Town

 

If you haven’t heard already, Henrico County Public Schools has a new superintendent, Dr. Amy Cashwell. Before entering school administration, Dr. Cashwell was a former second and fourth grade teacher in Virginia Beach. She credited her interest towards education to her childhood experience of growing up in a military family. “We moved a lot which means I went to a lot of different schools and sometimes those transitions were challenging. It was nice to know that I had teachers and staff rallied around making me feel safe and welcome” she said. Her “affinity for teaching” ever since she was little was another key factor in why she became a teacher.

Dr. Cashwell went into administration with the help of the experiences she g…

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Mr. Tolbert Expands Photography Club’s Boundaries

Jakob Larsen

The Glen Allen photography club has been around for a while, but the recent change in focus to the Film and Photography club has broadened the club’s focus as well as connected it with other clubs in the school. Mr. Tolbert, the new sponsor of photography club as well as the sponsor of the Rosette literary magazine for the past two years, explained his goal was to “streamline the process for students to generate art and have it exhibited in the literary magazine.” In the past, Mr. Tolbert said “obtaining art work, especially photography, has been challenging.” However, the connection between photography club and the literary magazine helps Jaguar photographers have their work displayed to the public. He also expanded the…

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The Deadline for AP Research Tasks is Approaching Faster than You Think

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The QUEST Model is crucial to the Capstone courses. The written papers and oral presentations are based off this model. Picture taken from: https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-capstone/how-ap-capstone-works

The AP Capstone Program consists of two courses, AP Seminar and AP Research, taught by Mr. Towslee and Mr. Zelenak, respectively. For AP Research, students must submit their performance tasks (a written paper and oral presentation) by April 30th. This year, students are doing projects ranging from topics on how exposure to nature affects teens’ to social media’s effects on perceived body image of teenagers.

Seniors Jordanne Rolan and Claire Pokrywka have gotten to a good place with their research, with only two weeks left until their final paper is due. Claire’s research focuses on Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the effect that a physician’s diagnosis of PCOS has on patients over the age of 13. “I feel nervous but excited for my project,” says Claire. “I was initially planning to interview gynecologists, then physicians, but finally I found someone who goes to Glen Allen High School who is willing to do talk to me about PCOS. I feel pretty good about where I’m at.”

Jordanne’s research, on the other hand, focuses on how the income disparity of parents of students at wealthier schools versus poorer schools in Henrico County affect the perception of their views of fast food chain availability in relation to how often it is consumed and their physical health. She plans to find the economic statistics of various schools in the county, and then send out questionnaires assessing physical health to students of these schools. “I still haven’t sent out the questionnaires, so I’m a bit stressed,” says Jordanne. “I hope to get the data quickly so I can present within the next week. I’m excited to see the results.”

Right now, there are thirteen students enrolled in the two-year program, and the seniors graduating this year will be the first students who have completed both years of the program. If the AP Capstone Program is one that interests you, don’t hesitate to contact Mr. Towslee or Mr. Zelenak.

Meet FeedMore’s CEO Doug Pick

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By: Momina Raja

If you want to help out in your Richmond Community, FeedMore is the place to do just that. FeedMore, also known as the Central Virginia Food Bank, is a wonderful organization that prepares, collects, and distributes food to the those in need. It’s a place where my family and I volunteer through programs such as food sorting and Meals on Wheels.

Last month I had the chance to interview FeedMore’s CEO, Doug Pick. Mr. Pick, who has been in this position for seven years now, had plenty of good things to say. From cleaning boats and being a mentor, to working at Capital One and Feedmore, he even gives us insight on what donation items they need most and a typical day at work.

What made you want to become CEO of FeedMore?                 

Up until we hit 50 years old we often think about success, and after 50 we start thinking about contribution. After I semi-retired from Capital One, I was looking for a complex non-profit to assist, and Jim Ukrop told me about FeedMore. I leapt at the opportunity to be a part of the organization.

Were there any Feed More clients that made a lasting impression on you?

One memory that will never leave me is when a lady walked into the lobby (I happened to be there) and put seven crumpled up $1 bills on the front desk as a donation. She let us know that she used to be a client and wanted to make a donation. I’ve always considered that the Holy Grail of our mission- helping folks to a point that they no longer need us.

What is a typical day of volunteering like at Feed More for those who are interested in helping out?

The great thing about volunteering at Feed More is that no two days are the same! Each weekday, we rely on more than 200 kind souls who donate their time and talents to our mission. From sorting nonperishable donations, to preparing and packaging food in our Community Kitchen to delivering our Meals on Wheels, our volunteers are the heart and soul of our hunger-fighting operations.

What’s the most popular meal at Feed More from Meals on Wheels?

I have heard that the meatloaf is some of the best! We have a nutritionist on staff who creates the menus each month and our Community Kitchen team and volunteers bring it to life! From chicken and dumplings to pulled BBQ pork to mac and cheese, our Community Kitchen team lives by the philosophy “food is love” and works to create meals that are nutritious and delicious.

What’s the most popular donation item and what item do you need the most?

Peanut butter is like gold in our world! It has a long shelf life, is rich in nutrients and just about everyone loves a peanut butter and jelly sandwich! Some of our other most wanted items include lean canned protein (like tuna or chicken) in water, canned fruits and veggies, spaghetti sauce, beans, whole grain cereal, pasta, quinoa, brown rice and healthy snacks like fruit cups, raisins or granola bars.

What time of the year is most neglected and you need more donations than you usually get?

Summers are usually the time when we see a decrease in our donations of food, funds and time, and an increase in need across our 34 county and city service areas.

With kids out of school for the summer, those that struggle with hunger worry where they will get their next meal. Family’s food budgets are stretched thin during the summer months and programs like our Summer Food Service Program, which provides free breakfast and lunch meals to kids 18 and younger, helps meet the need.

What is your favorite part about Feed More? 

The people who make our mission possible – our compassionate staff, dedicated volunteers and generous community of supporters who give so much of themselves to Feed More.

What was the first volunteer job that you had or enjoyed most?

My first real volunteer job was that I served as a “big brother” twice a week during the summers of 1971 and 1972 at St. Vincent’s Home for Boys. It was a Catholic home (run by nuns) for boys that had been taken from their homes by the Courts due to a number of often dysfunctional family issues. It was an eye opening experience for this Methodist boy who had never been confronted with those issues and their ensuing repercussions. It helped me develop a great sense of gratitude as a 16/17 year old, for all that I had been given by my family and society.

The most unusual jobs I had were all in my teenage years during three summers. I dug ditches for a summer; stacked and soaked railway ties in creosote; and when I was 14, cleaned dried algae off the bottom of boats with muriatic acid.

What is the best way for high school students like me to be involved with ending hunger in our community?

The first step is doing what you are doing by writing this article – raising awareness about the serious issue of hunger in our community. Talking about hunger and educating individuals on how you can help fight hunger is the first big step.

We find that many individuals first connect to our mission by making a donation of food through a food drive; knowing that the can of vegetables they donate will go to a neighbor who needs it is powerful.

 

Are you inspired by the work at FeedMore? Visit https://feedmore.org/volunteer/opportunities/ or reach out to Mr. Pick and his staff for more detailed information!

Red Cross Club is Now at Glen Allen High

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A typical meeting for Red Cross Club. Meetings are in the morning on every third Friday of each month, around 8:15 am in the lecture hall. Photo credit: Momina Raja

Red Cross Club, a new club at Glen Allen High School, focuses on giving blood, helping victims of disasters, and educating people about emergency preparedness and fire prevention. The current officers for the 2018-2019 school year are: Mia Varghese, Nancy Hoang, Anna Liu, and Momina Raja.

This club has over 20 active members and holds meetings on the third Friday of every month in the lecture hall. Students in the club can earn volunteer hours towards graduation for simply attending the meetings! In November of 2018, Jon Reinmuth, a Henrico County Firefighter, came to speak to the club about fire safety and how to prevent fires in homes. The club learned about the types of fires and how to properly put out  fire. In January of 2019, the club made fire safety posters to inform students about the likelihood of kitchen and bedroom fires. In February of 2019, the club donated supplies such as Vaseline, socks, and coffee supplies to the Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center, a veteran’s hospital. If you are interested in being part of the club for the 2019-2020 school year, don’t be afraid to reach out via email to hcps-varghesme@henricostudents.org, or check out the club’s website at tinyurl.com/gahsrc.

There’s a New Superintendent in Town

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Amy Cashwell, new superintendent of HCPS, visits the Glen Allen High School Library. She is excited about working with all HCPS employees and students and working to provide the best education for all.

 

If you haven’t heard already, Henrico County Public Schools has a new superintendent, Dr. Amy Cashwell. Before entering school administration, Dr. Cashwell was a former second and fourth grade teacher in Virginia Beach. She credited her interest towards education to her childhood experience of growing up in a military family. “We moved a lot which means I went to a lot of different schools and sometimes those transitions were challenging. It was nice to know that I had teachers and staff rallied around making me feel safe and welcome” she said. Her “affinity for teaching” ever since she was little was another key factor in why she became a teacher.

Dr. Cashwell went into administration with the help of the experiences she gained from working in the school system. She stated that, “While I was a teacher I was able to take on some different leadership roles.” She served as a department chair, took on lots of committee work, and as she said, she “started getting involved in helping write and shape the curriculum not just for the teachers in the school where I was teaching but for the whole school division that I was working in at the time.”

She began to see the impacts made on the students. She said, “not just the classroom but the whole team of people thinking about what it looks like across the system.” From this she made the decision to obtain a master’s degree in administration, leading to her role of assistant principal and eventually principal, in addition to where she is now.

As of now, Dr. Cashwell hopes to help Henrico County Public Schools “maintain its reputation for excellence.” She hopes that there will be changes made in the areas of equity, diversity, and inclusivity. Her main goal is that students and their families should feel that there are equal opportunities for them “no matter what their gender, socio-economic status, religion, and race is.” She stated that she would “really like to see that be one of the major steps that we take forward as a school division during my time here.”

Apart from school related activities, Dr. Cashwell enjoys gardening with her daughters whenever she finds free time in her packed schedule. When asked if she could travel anywhere in the world, she replied with “some place in Asia” so that she could take an actual look at the history of the world “which you can’t really get from here.” The interview concluded with a piece of advice from her to our graduating seniors. She advised them to “Think about your growth and development as a person, and not just academically. Many times seniors are thinking about what they have to do to meet the course requirements required but they often miss the opportunities to grow as a person and become life ready.” Glen Allen Jaguars are excited to have such a great role model and want her to know that she’s welcome to visit anytime!

 

Mr. Tolbert Expands Photography Club’s Boundaries

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Junior Aliza Schwarz’s photo of a rose.

Jakob Larsen

The Glen Allen photography club has been around for a while, but the recent change in focus to the Film and Photography club has broadened the club’s focus as well as connected it with other clubs in the school. Mr. Tolbert, the new sponsor of photography club as well as the sponsor of the Rosette literary magazine for the past two years, explained his goal was to “streamline the process for students to generate art and have it exhibited in the literary magazine.” In the past, Mr. Tolbert said “obtaining art work, especially photography, has been challenging.” However, the connection between photography club and the literary magazine helps Jaguar photographers have their work displayed to the public. He also expanded the reach of the club to include not just photography, but films as well. The goal of this change was to “allow students to engage in conversation about film,” Mr. Tolbert said.

Along with photography, some of the club’s meetings are to watch and discuss a particular movie. The club usually meets once a month in Mr. Tolbert’s room, where they often watch and discuss films. Members of the club especially enjoyed watching Rear Window directed by Alfred Hitchcock, as well as many others.

Finally, Mr. Tolbert has some advice for photographers. He says the best way to improve your photography skills is to “look toward other artists as mentors.” With time, he says, “you will cease to emulate and eventually find your own artistic voice.”

Girl Up Becomes Part of Glen Allen High

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Girl Up is one of the newest clubs at Glen Allen High School for the 2018-2019 school year and is sponsored by Ms. Shevchuk and run by president Kathryn DeBusk. Senior Kat DeBusk, who is also involved Student Council, drama, BACK, and Model UN, said, “My friend Sarah was in Girl Up at Hermitage, so I looked into the idea and thought it would be really cool to start at Glen Allen.”

In this Tuesday forum, Kat talks about various issues that surround women today. These issues include poverty, lack of hygiene products, and trafficking. Photo Credit: Momina Raja

The club focuses on empowering women and there are over 50 members participating. DeBusk explains, “We try to bring awareness to the struggles that young women in developing countries face. We want to make sure girls around the world have access to medical care, education, sanitary and hygiene products, and more. Recently, we conducted a feminine hygiene drive to benefit Period Patch, an organization that helps RVA’s homeless and displaced women with their monthly cycles. We also are in the process of installing feminine hygiene product dispensers in the bathrooms of GAHS as a long-term solution.”

Interested in joining this club? The sponsor is Ms. Shevchuk and she can be found in room 111, and the club is always open to new members. Meetings are every week on Tuesdays at 8:15 a.m. in room 111.Topics range from human trafficking to wellness in women. There are also Tuesday forums, where people submit something they want to know more about, such as sex trafficking or struggles for women in third world countries. Impactful videos are shown and much needed discussions are held. There is a remind group that anyone can join (text @girlupga to 81010), just talk to either Kat or Ms. Shevchuk. It’s a great way to change the world through empowering women!

 

The Richmond Folk Festival

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As the dancers of the Zuni Olla Maidens entered the performance space, balancing decorated ceramic pots called Olla on their heads, they transformed their ancestors’ essential, life-giving work of carrying water from the river into an eloquent dance tradition. The dance originates from Zuni, New Mexico.
Photo Credit: Ali Merchant

The Richmond Folk Festival is one of Virginia’s largest events, drawing visitors from all over the country to downtown Richmond’s historic riverfront. The Festival is a free three-day event that got its start as the National Folk Festival held in Richmond from 2005-2007.

This year’s Richmond Folk Festival featured performing groups representing a diverse array of cultural traditions on seven stages.This year’s festival occurred from Friday, October 12 to Sunday, October 15th, 2018.

Many groups came from places such as Turkey, Indonesia, New Mexico, and different parts of the United States. The festival also featured many different cuisines such as traditional ramen and grilled alligator. 

“The alligator tastes kind of like teriyaki chicken,” said ICERV Volunteer Azim Ladhani. “I’ve been doing this for the past three years and I love it! The feeling I get from serving my community is incomparable to anything else.” This year, he volunteered on the green team, a group of people who walk around the nine-mile-long festival and clean up the trash that has been scattered around Brown’s Island.

Many vendors attended the Folk Festival and brought their special cuisine with them. Foods ranged from the classic Burger and Fries of America, to Dumplings from China, and even Chicken Masala and Samosas from India.
Photo Credit: Ali Merchant

The Folk Festival featured many voluntary service opportunities such as fundraising, merchandise sales, safety escorts, and the green team. The festival ran all day and the opportunities for service, food, and fun were endless, from trying new foods to listening to creative music.

Tackling the Past and Rushing the Future

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Football has never been a point of pride for Glen Allen, until now. Coach Camp and the hardworking players have changed the outlook on what is Glen Allen football.

When Coach Camp first came to Glen Allen from Dayton, Florida three years ago, there were not instant results. Camp previously coached teams in Florida to state titles, but the GA team continued to struggle. But, time is needed to build a winning culture in football, as in any sport. Our Jaguars took on years of hard work, dedication, and also failure to come to this success.

There have been several exciting games for the team this year, including dominating wins such as 34-14 win against Glen Allen’s rival Deep Run and the 35-6 win at Marshall. Senior Donovan Reddick, the starting Quarterback, says their best game was against Lee-Davis this season, “It was one of our first wins this season; it was where we learned how to battle back and win when we are down at first.” Donovan is very humble about his success, but he was named 804 Varsity player of the week twice this season.

Coach Camp leads a line drill in preparation for the upcoming game Friday. Even though there are many different parts of a football team, the Glen Allen football team is close and connected like a family.

A new surprise this year for the team has been Chris Butler, a star member of the basketball team who now plays wide receiver. Transitioning between sports comes with its difficulties, Chris said. “It wasn’t easy, I’ve been playing basketball for three years, but everyone on the team made it easier for me by supporting and guiding me,” he said. Chris Butler was named All-Region 1st team Wide Receiver.

Now, the football team is 8-2. This is not only the best record in school history, but the first winning record as well. Their only two losses have been against a very strong Monacan team, who is a two seed in the 4A playoff bracket, and a one-point loss to Freeman. All of their wins have not been so close. The closest any team got besides those two losses was in a 14-point victory by Glen Allen against Godwin.

Going into the first playoff game in school history, the Glen Allen team is confident but grounded. Junior Devan Flowers says, “We are working together really well as a team. A lot of these guys have been playing together since freshman year. We went through all the losses like losing 40-0. With all the hard work we’ve put together the past 3 years it is really coming together at a good time.” Devin Flowers was named All-Region 2nd team Line Backer. Glen Allen will play at Atlee on November 9th, and the theme is WHITE-OUT. Come support our Jags!

On a muddy and torn up football field, a receiver falls but is being helped back up by his teammate. The football fields needs constant attention that is provided by Coach J and the maintenance staff.

Murals: the Journey of a Senior Art Tradition at GAHS

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Some seniors taking art work on their murals in the front of the 600s hallway. These seniors have dedicated – and continue to dedicate – countless hours to their art in order to represent creativity in themselves, as well as in the walls of Glen Allen High School. Photo taken by: Brandon Dung.

By: Brandon Dung

The 600s hallway, also recognized as the arts hallway, is always a memorable place for current students, alumni, or any other visitors to Glen Allen High School. Everyone walks into the hall in amazement as they see the craftsmanship in each and every work of art. Some admirers even take pictures and selfies by them. As their final project, senior art students are invited to decorate the hallway with a beautiful mural of their choice. From the opening of the school, the walls have been getting filled as each senior class graduates, making it what it is now. Each mural is completely different from each other as well the meaning behind them, but the things that connects them all together, regardless of everything, are the achievement. Being able to paint a mural shows the dedication of a student willing to take visual arts for four to five consecutive years straight. The excitement of underclassmen as they watch seniors paint is evident, seeing themselves painting their own mural one day.

As each class continues to add onto the hall, the spaces become limited. For the past three years, students have been trying to obtain extra space for murals so that previous ones do not have to be covered. The Class of 2015 were granted an alcove to allow for their entire class to paint new spaces. The following year, however, students had to cover up past murals in order to make room for theirs. In order to avoid such tragedy, I led the initiative to obtain more space by talking to administrators, teachers, staff, as well as the former principal of Glen Allen High School, Gwen Miller. I rallied Glen Allen to the extent of creating a petition, gaining over 500+ signatures towards the cause, but ultimately the attempt was unsuccessful.

Many of the murals are nearing completion; all Jags should definitely walk through the 600s hall to check out these works-in-progress to see the amazing transformations. Visitors passing through might even see some seniors working on their murals who would love to chat about their inspiration and process! Photo taken by: Brandon Dung.

This year the Jags were able to get a brand new hallway for the Class of 2018, allowing eighteen new murals to be added. It also serves as the connecting factor for the area between the hall and alcove. The process begins with students forming a general idea of what one wants their mural to be. Then, the student will make it come to life on paper, fitting the design to a grid and making it proportionate to the wall itself. Next our murals are placed in certain areas so that it can accommodate space as well as complement each other. Finally sketching and painting on the wall begins which could take weeks until the finished product. As the year comes to a close for seniors, murals are beginning to finish as we leave our mark upon our former home, yet we will always be part of the Jaguar family.

Congratulating the Class of 2018

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May has not only ushered in warm weather, but also the Class of 2018’s last full month as Glen Allen High School students. Whether it be higher education, entering the work force, joining the military, taking a gap year, or any of the countless opportunities this year’s graduates will have after receiving their diplomas at graduation on June 12th at the VCU Siegel Center, Senior Jags are eagerly anticipating graduation and their last day of high school.

Glen Allen High School has taken many actions to celebrate this year’s Seniors and their next steps after high school. Not only will all Seniors gain recognition on June 1st on their last full day of high school at the Senior Honors Assembly, but numerous other communal and individual recognitions and celebratory activities have occurred and will occur leading up to it.

To celebrate May 1st, National College Decision Day where students must finally commit to a University if they plan on attending one, Sunrise Studios allowed Seniors to sign up to announce where they decided to go to school live on the morning announcements on May 7th during homeroom. Many students were thrilled for the opportunity to share with their peers where they planned on attending and making such an important and exciting decision, as well as making it a more communal experience. Upperclassmen watching got to support their peers, and underclassmen were reminded of one of the amazing opportunities a strong education can create.

Per tradition, Seniors were asked to share their “next steps” with administration so that a large banner listing all members of the senior class and what they plan on doing after they graduate from high school could be displayed. The banners listed the entire class’s post-graduation plans, displaying them in the commons to congratulate students on their graduation and the amazing opportunities they plan on pursing, as well as creating a sense of community for Seniors.

Students who received scholarships from Universities, whether they were accepted or denied, were formally invited to the annual scholarship breakfast on May 24th to celebrate their academic achievements and awards with administration, peers, and family.

Seniors were also encouraged to decorate a large paw print with their future plans, including military, career, or college. Many students pursing higher level education took the opportunity to display their school pride and decorate them with the colors and symbols of their University. Others shared where they planned on working, as well as what area of the military they wanted to go into. These were then hung up and displayed on the windows by the senior courtyard.

Not only are measures being taken to celebrate Senior Jags, but educate them for the hardships and independence they will experience as an adult graduate. For example, teacher Mr. Walton will be giving a lecture to the senior class about life and the journey they are about to embark on May 25th during J-Step. He has given these types of lectures for the past four years to graduating classes, and many students are eagerly anticipating the event.

Seniors are also looking forward to coming back to Glen Allen after their last official day of high school to further celebrate graduation. Student government collaborated with teachers to plan the Class of 2018’s Baccalaureate service on June 3rd. Additionally, after a mandatory graduation practice on June 8th, Seniors will be able to get food for free from a catering service, as well as participate in fun activities, at the senior picnic.

Staff

Adviser: Melissa McLamb
Co-Editors: Elaina Coviello & Maggie Nuckols
Section Editors: Lauren Baugham & Morgan Deckert
Photography & Graphic Design: Bailey Steele
Social Networks: Jamison Crenshaw & Claire Bernard
HoGA: Emily Bickford & Oscar Gamez
Interactives/Monthly Flyer: Ashleigh Russo & Kelly Riggan
Writers: Kaylee Bagley, Cassie Coughlan, Paxton O'Brien, Sara Beth Stansberry, Brian Fadool, & Joshua Holtzman