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Morgan Deckert

Congratulating the Class of 2018

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May has not only ushered in warm weather, but also the Class of 2018’s last full month as Glen Allen High School students. Whether it be higher education, entering the work force, joining the military, taking a gap year, or any of the countless opportunities this year’s graduates will have after receiving their diplomas at graduation on June 12th at the VCU Siegel Center, Senior Jags are eagerly anticipating graduation and their last day of high school.

Glen Allen High School has taken many actions to celebrate this year’s Seniors and their next steps after high school. Not only will all Seniors gain recognition on June 1st on their last full day of high school at the Senior Honors Assembly, but numerous other communal and individual recognitions and celebratory activities have occurred and will occur leading up to it.

To celebrate May 1st, National College Decision Day where students must finally commit to a University if they plan on attending one, Sunrise Studios allowed Seniors to sign up to announce where they decided to go to school live on the morning announcements on May 7th during homeroom. Many students were thrilled for the opportunity to share with their peers where they planned on attending and making such an important and exciting decision, as well as making it a more communal experience. Upperclassmen watching got to support their peers, and underclassmen were reminded of one of the amazing opportunities a strong education can create.

Per tradition, Seniors were asked to share their “next steps” with administration so that a large banner listing all members of the senior class and what they plan on doing after they graduate from high school could be displayed. The banners listed the entire class’s post-graduation plans, displaying them in the commons to congratulate students on their graduation and the amazing opportunities they plan on pursing, as well as creating a sense of community for Seniors.

Students who received scholarships from Universities, whether they were accepted or denied, were formally invited to the annual scholarship breakfast on May 24th to celebrate their academic achievements and awards with administration, peers, and family.

Seniors were also encouraged to decorate a large paw print with their future plans, including military, career, or college. Many students pursing higher level education took the opportunity to display their school pride and decorate them with the colors and symbols of their University. Others shared where they planned on working, as well as what area of the military they wanted to go into. These were then hung up and displayed on the windows by the senior courtyard.

Not only are measures being taken to celebrate Senior Jags, but educate them for the hardships and independence they will experience as an adult graduate. For example, teacher Mr. Walton will be giving a lecture to the senior class about life and the journey they are about to embark on May 25th during J-Step. He has given these types of lectures for the past four years to graduating classes, and many students are eagerly anticipating the event.

Seniors are also looking forward to coming back to Glen Allen after their last official day of high school to further celebrate graduation. Student government collaborated with teachers to plan the Class of 2018’s Baccalaureate service on June 3rd. Additionally, after a mandatory graduation practice on June 8th, Seniors will be able to get food for free from a catering service, as well as participate in fun activities, at the senior picnic.

Civil Service Jaguars: Student Government Day

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On Thursday March 15th, Glen Allen participated in the 61st annual Student Government Day. More than 100 students from high schools all over Henrico County were able to get a firsthand look at the inner workings of employees making up their local governments.

Senior Kalista Pepper and Dr. William Noel stand at the podium as she gives a speech about abolishing the Zero Tolerance Policy, believing punishments in cases should vary via the age and maturity of children. He is the director of the Disciplinary Review Office, who she shadowed. Picture taken by Andy Jenks.

Each student who decided to participate with a local government official, including judges, members of the School Board and Board of Supervisors, and more. Once paired with an official, students then shadowed them for the day to better understand not only the position the official held and the roles and responsibilities that went along with it, but also to gain insight into how Henrico’s local government works.

Student Government Day officially began on Wednesday March 14th at Hermitage High School, where students attended a ceremony that night.

There, students each swore the oaths required for their temporary position to both help them gain a better understanding of the job and truly grasp the responsibility the job held and that they would have to carry.

Kalista Pepper participates in a mock hearing to determine whether or not a student should be long-term expelled. Her shadow, Dr. Noel, frequently has to do this with students, and allowed her the opportunity to understand the experience first-hand. Picture taken by Andy Jenks.

The next day, students had to report for work early in the morning, 8: 30a.m to be exact, and lateness was not tolerated, as would be true in the real world; students were treated completely as adults and like they held the position. Students spent the rest of the day observing their government employee at work, as well assisting with and doing their job for themselves.

Glen Allen Seniors Kalista Pepper and Tri Nguyen pose for a picture after a successful mock Board of Supervisors meeting. Both students are currently in AP Government and were excited to apply what they learned in class to their real-life experience. Picture taken by Andy Jenks.

At the end of the day at 2p.m was a simulated meeting of the Board of Supervisors in the Board Room of the Henrico Government Center.

Senior Paxton O’Bryen, a current AP Government student, participated in the event this year. On her experience, she said, “Student government day was a very enriching view into the world of local government. It was amazing to see just how much goes on that we rarely think about.” She shadowed Judge Margaret W Deglau, a juvenile and domestic relations court judge. “As a judge, I was able to sit in on cases and tour the juvenile detention center,” she said.

Overall, students found student government day an unforgettable educational experience to apply what they have learned and step into someone else’s shoes, as well as for local government employees to have an impact on the youth around them and bestow their knowledge and experience. Anyone interested in learning more about the local government and the everyday workings at certain government jobs is encouraged to participate next year!

 

 

 

Jaguars and Tiaras: Mr. Glen Allen 2018

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On Friday February 16th, Glen Allen hosted one of its most beloved traditions: the Mr. Glen Allen male pageant. Nearly every Jaguar showed up for this incredibly popular event, not only to earn Battle of the Classes points for their grade levels (points were awarded based on the amount of students from each grade level that attended), but also to show support for the men at Glen Allen and enjoy one of the most hilarious and entertaining events of the year.

Mr. Glen Allen contestants put aside their competitiveness for a group dance. This was one of the most highly anticipated events of the evening. Picture taken by Maggie Nuckols.

As per tradition, the event was broken up into eight parts: the group dance, group roll call, individual costume portions, the talent show, formal wear, selection of the top five, questioning of the top five, and selection of the winner.

The event started at 7:00pm, the doors opening at 6:30pm for any students who wanted to be there early and ensure they got good seating. Tickets had been available for purchase during school lunches prior to the event, but students were also able to buy tickets at the door if they had not purchased them prior.

Mr. Glen Allen 2018 opened with a bang, one of the notable events, the group dance, announcing the beginning of the event.

After the event was over, all contestants and their dates gathered for a group picture. Also pictured to the left are event organizers Ms. Carpenter and Mr. Dean. Picture taken by Maggie Nuckols.

Contestants dressed in white button-ups and dark shorts, a Mr. Glen Allen opening dance signature, to wow the crowd with their moves. Using popular music and, at times, risqué dancing, they easily wowed the crowd and got everyone excited for what was to come.

Afterwards, contestants did a roll call, getting into a semi-circle formation and introducing themselves to the crowd via the popular “roll call” song accompanied by a dance.

This year, Mr. Glen Allen was hosted by Senior Taliyah Dozier. Throughout the night, she had two different cohosts. Cole Tutwiler, a Mr. Glen Allen contestant last year and now freshman at George Mason University, was cohost for the first portion. For the second, last year’s Mr. Glen Allen winner and current student at James Madison University, Grant Schowalter, was cohost.

Participant and Junior Josh Holtzman gave it his all during the group performance. He, like all the other contestants, was dedicated to putting on a good show and potentially winning. Picture taken by Maggie Nuckols.

Both former contestants and cohosts also during the night stepped out from behind the podium host and back into the spotlight, reenacting their iconic performances from last year. Cole danced with his girlfriend, Glen Allen Senior Abby Dodd, and Grant replicated his unique act manipulating yoga balls.

Moving on to the next portion of the evening, contestants were introduced one at a time with and in their costumes they had picked out. Some notable costumers were Josh Holtzman as English teacher Mr. Towslee, Junior Jahin Ghazi as character Dwight Schrute from popular T.V. show, the Office¸ and Soham Apte as Math teacher Mr. Dean.

Afterwards, each contestant got to do a performance of their choosing in the talent show, another one of the most notorious portions of the Mr. Glen Allen event. Contestants brought their A-game this year, perfecting traditional acts and pushing the boundaries with new and, to say the least, interesting ones.

Senior Soham Apte performed an interesting act where he and some assisting Jaguars wore robes and spat and sprayed water around and at one another, Senior Thomas Gordon mixed good and bad in his “the best and worst band you will ever see” performance, and Senior Nolan McKinney sang, to name a few.

Senior Soham Apte and some of his fellow Jaguars performed one of the most interesting and unique talents in Mr. Glen Allen history. The act consisted of wearing robes, spitting water, and posing at times. Picture taken by Maggie Nuckols.

Contestants then transitioned into the formal wear portion of the evening, walking onto the stage in their best and most elegant wear, escorted by a female date also in formal wear. Adding a flare to the event, Junior Sam Joyner handed a judge a whisk during this portion. Afterwards, the top five contestants were announced, and these five were asked questions that determined who would finally come out on top and be crowned Mr. Glen Allen 2018.

After much deliberation, judges eventually crowned Junior Sam Joyner Mr. Glen Allen, and Senior Keegan Manning as runner up, ending the event.

First Ever Poetry Cafe Slams Glen Allen

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Students attending the poetry café were welcome to a variety of food before and during the poetry readings. Food was provided by Mr. Tolbert, who cooked the cupcakes and pigs in a blanket featured above, as well as Literary Magazine students, who cooked the brownies and other foods above. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

On February 14th, Glen Allen had its first poetry café of the 2017-2018 school year. All students were invited to attend in the library during J-Step for snacks, entertainment, and a chance to share their work with an enthusiastic audience.

Created by English teacher Mr. Tolbert, the poetry café is a way for students to have freedom of expression and an outlet for their creativity while simultaneously being introduced to new styles of writing and developing their writing skills.

Glen Allen’s Literary Magazine also helped create and host the event, members bringing in food and organizing the event. Additionally, all students who submitted and/or read their poetry were urged to submit their creation to the Literary Magazine to potentially be published in the 2017-2018 edition. This year’s Literary Magazine theme is “UnchARTed.”

Students eagerly wait for the poetry café to begin. Although many students were originally nervous to share their poems, the positive energy of their fellow students soon allowed them to share without fear. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Each month will be centered around a certain format of poetry, this month being villanelles. Villanelles are nineteen-line poems with two repeating rhymes and two refrains. The first and third lines of the opening tercet are repeated alternately in the last lines of the succeeding stanzas and, in the final stanza, the refrain serves as the poem’s two concluding lines. However, students were also welcome to share poems that did not revolve around this particular structure, and many did.

Students and teachers around the school showed their support for the poetry café. Students, particularly those part of the Literary Magazine, enthusiastically advertised the event to students. Additionally, many teachers offered students extra credit opportunities to create poems and share them at

Mr. Tolbert introduces the poetry café to students. He even wrote and shared his own villanelle with the poetry café. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

the poetry café. Mr. Tolbert offered extra credit to his English classes if they created and presented a villanelle at the event. Similarly, Spanish teacher Ms. Lemco allowed her AP Spanish V students to write poems (an English and Spanish translation) and present them at the café for extra credit, which added to the diversity and enrichment of the event, as well as the fun.

Plans are already in the work for next month’s poetry reading, the “poem of the month” being sonnets. Sonnets are poems with fourteen lines that follow any of a number of formal rhyme schemes, and typically follow iambic pentameter (ten syllables per line) All students are welcome and urged to participate, sonnet or otherwise!

 

Honors Humanities Takes the VMFA

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On Thursday November 2nd, Glen Allen’s Honors Humanities classes went on a field trip to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. This is the first of four field trips that Humanities students will take over the course of the

Before or after students found their piece to analyze, they were encouraged to get lunch at the museum café. Not only did the café offer reasonably priced and delicious food, but a stunning view. Picture taken by Cara Crenshaw.

2017-2018 school year, as both 5th and 7th block classes will go once per marking period.

Created by AP Literature and Composition teacher Mr. Tolbert, Honors Humanities is an elective class that aims at studying the creative process of tradition through history. This means that for each unit, centered around a specific theme, students will look at multiple pieces of art, whether they be literature, music, sculpture, dance, paintings, and more. They will then look at what particular elements these pieces use to convey certain themes, find out what the pieces are trying to convey, and compare pieces to each other.

The majority of MP1 in Humanities focused on the Consumerism and Connectivity unit, where students learned about different people’s takes on and reactions to an increasingly technology-dependent world. Students were also encouraged to examine themselves and their levels of technology use and connectivity with others, and in doing so realize the importance of being able to step back from the artifice of technology and pursue genuine human interaction.

This piece of art is titled “Xilempasto 6” and was made by Henrique Oliveira in 2013 from plywood and pigment. In the modern art exhibit, this was one of dozens of pieces students had to choose from to analyze. Picture taken by Cara Crenshaw.

Thus, students were tasked with finding a modern piece of art that comments on our consumerist and hyper-connected society. Then, students were first asked to observe and experience the piece, taking in such details as colors, shapes, forms, lines, and texture, as well as the emotions their particular piece invoked.

 

After, they broke down each feature they noted and analyzed what significance it brings to the piece. Then, students used this compiled information to get to the “deeper meaning” of the piece and discover what the art is trying to convey about society and the human experience as a whole. Finally, they compiled their observations and analysis to create a well-crafted, one-paragraph art analysis.

Many Honor Humanities students find the field trips to the VMFA one of the most enjoyable parts of the class, as it allows them the chance to engage with artwork on new levels and in an independent way.

Honors Humanities students Karen Salazar and Karoline Marzouk admire a Greek pot in the ancient art section of the VMFA. After students completed their assignment, they were free to explore the rest of the museum and its art. Picture taken by Paxton O’Bryen.

“The VMFA gives us the opportunity to experience art in person, which allows us to interact with it on a deeper level than is possible on a screen in class,” said Senior Paxton O’Bryen, who takes Honors Humanities 7th block.

Incorporating a class based on analyzing art and universal themes, allowing students to better understand and access the world around them, is extremely important in the development of a well-rounded person. Honors Humanities is one of the few classes that allows for this, letting students experience a very subjective and through-provoking class among the other more technical classes at Glen Allen.

Annual State Fair Hits Virginia

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One of the most highly anticipated events by almost every Virginian is the annual State Fair of Virginia.

Animals were also a popular attraction, ranging from large animals like goats and cows to smaller ones such as baby ducklings and chicks. One of the more popular animals were the donkeys. Picture taken by Olivia Weitzel.

One of the most popular aspects of the fair is the carnival games. Not only are the games themselves fun, but the opportunity to win fun prizes are too good to pass up! Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

This year, it began Friday, September 29th and ended Sunday, October 8th, and was open Monday-Thursday and Sunday 10am-9pm, as well as Friday and Saturday 10am-10pm. This year, the state fair partnered with Walgreens for ticketing, all Walgreens establishments offering early and discounted tickets.

Located as always at the Meadow Event Park, this annual event drew thousands and thousands of visitors over the two weeks it was open, providing entertainment for people of all ages.

There were dozens of booths, ranging from Democratic and Republican party booths to bathroom remodeling to crafts & jewelry. There were also numerous art displays, ranging from paintings to sculptures to photography and products such as purses, candles, and jewelry.

There were also dozens of food booths, offering savory foods such as turkey legs and French fries to sweet deserts such as fried Oreos and funnel cakes. Additionally, there were a number of rides, including the famous Ferris Wheel, swings, carousel, bumper cars, round up, pirate ship, and more!

Along with other rides, the classic bumper cars were also a popular attraction. They offered a fun and competitive way for guests to spend their time and tickets. Picture taken by Olivia Weitzel.

Aside from the given food and rides, there were also many additional attractions for people to enjoy. Famous Rosaire’s racing pigs were one of the most popular, returning after being received with huge success in the past. Additionally, the state fair’s annual rodeo occurred October 5th and 6th, sponsored this year by the Virginia Horse Festival. Other popular attractions included the XPogo Stunt Team, Demolition Derby, Virginia State Auctioneer Contest, chainsaw carving, agri-puppets, and more!

The Heritage Village Music Series, sponsored by the Virginia Commission for the Arts and Performing Arts Touring Assistance, was also a huge hit, ranging in activities from historical displays and reenactments to transport people back to simpler times to traditional Virginian music by artists belonging to the esteemed Crooked Road Music Trail.

One of the most popular aspects of the fair is the carnival games. Not only are the games themselves fun, but the opportunity to win fun prizes are too good to pass up! Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Additionally, Young MacDonald’s farm offered a variety of animals for the public to view and engage with. The SouthLand Dairy Farm Center provided cows, along with hand-milking demos and other exhibits. Other animals included were the ever-popular sliding ducks, baby chicks, roosters, pigs, and goats.

This year, as per tradition, many Glen Allen students visited the fair.

Senior Isabella Barbosa went this year, and said, “Feeling down? Go to the fair.

One of the main reasons the state fair is so highly anticipated is the amazing food. One of the options offered as Kona Ice truck with snow cones, which allows people the opportunity to apply their own syrup. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Feeling adventurous? Go to the fair. Feeling overwhelmingly hungry, with weird food cravings? Go to the fair!” There are so many things to do that pretty much anyone can find something that interests them!

For more information about this year’s fair, as well as next one’s, visit http://www.statefairva.org/.

Glen Allen Hosts Second Annual Job Fair

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Chipotle’s booth was one of the most popular this year. Not only did they hand out job applications, but headphones, coupons, candy, information, and more. Picture taken by Lauren Baugham.

Branching off from a traditional job fair, Glen Allen invited the U.S. Navy. The Army was also present. Picture taken by Lauren Baugham.

Appealing to those seeking part-time summer employment was Swimming Management. A variety of positions are available here, from being a lifeguard to management. Picture taken by Lauren Baugham.

With summer fast approaching, many students have begun searching for a summer job. On April 28th, Glen Allen opened its doors to many local businesses to help students with their searches, allowing students the opportunity to apply for jobs, find internships, and gain volunteer opportunities.

The job fair last year was at first intended to just be a one-time occurrence. However, the event was so popular among students that Glen Allen decided to not only host it again, but to invite a wider variety and number of businesses.

Junior Emily Wells said, “I really loved the variety this year. There were so many more businesses here, as well as the internships, which was a new feature.”

Some of the most popular places of employment present were Chipotle, Wawa, McDonalds, Publix, iHop, Mathnasium, and more. Also present were a number of college booths, booths offering volunteer opportunities, the Democratic and Republican parties of Virginia offering internship opportunities, and the United States Army and Marine Corps.

Junior Sydney Gore said, “I loved the job fair last year, and loved it even more this year. Entering the work force is really important, and I’m glad to see that Glen Allen has decided to actively help its students do that.”

Not only did Glen Allen host a job fair, but also resume workshops April 25th and 26th during J-Step to help students struggling with putting together a professional and eye-catching resume. Many students found it helpful, and the session was highly recommended as a resume can make or break a potential employer’s opinion of someone.

Jags Have a Victorious Start to Baseball Season

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After taking a break from the field in the dugout, members of the Glen Allen baseball team storm the field. With renewed energy, they are eager to prevent Gloucester from scoring. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

The Glen Allen varsity baseball team has been hard at work with extensive and intense practice in preparation for the upcoming season. Even though the season just officially started (their first game on March 20th against Tucker), they collected victories from all six of their recent games.

Glen Allen has defeated Tucker (6-5), Freeman (2-0), Lee Davis (8-6), Gloucester (13-5), Maggie Walker (2-1), and Henrico (10-1). This has earned them a 3rd-place RVA ranking, falling only behind Benedictine in second and Godwin in first (as of April 6th).

The Jaguars have pulled together a strong team this year, a fact obvious in many of the games on the field. On March 21st, junior Kenny Jackson in his varsity debut managed to earn Glen Allen a no-hitter victory against Freeman. Senior Zach Gregory also managed to throw a complete game and only give up one hit at the game against Henrico on March 30th.

Junior Connor Hicks takes to home plate, eager for the chance to earn points for his team. Freeman players in the field are completely focused and prepared to react. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Junior Sydney Gore said, “I really hope they do well this year. From what I’ve seen from the two home games I’ve attended, it seems like there are so many good players, so I’m sure they will!”

Being the 2015 4A Virginia State Champions, there are high expectations for the players and the season.

Junior Nick Fowler said, “All of the players have been working really hard this season, and it’s really paid off. I think they definitely have the potential to be Virginia State Champions again this year.”

To view the Glen Allen baseball schedule, go to http://www.colonialdistrictva.org/public/genie/365/school/714/.

Gearing Up with College Tours

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Morgan Deckert

 

 

Duke University is an extremely prestigious out-of-state school in North Carolina with a very classic campus. A medium-sized private university, Duke has extremely strong and competitive sports and academics. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Duke University is an extremely prestigious out-of-state school in North Carolina with a very classic campus. A medium-sized private university, Duke has extremely strong and competitive sports and academics. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

With juniors entering the first phases of their search for the perfect college and seniors solidifying their choices, college tours are becoming more and more important. Seeing colleges in person is a major part of the college search process and can make or break a student’s desire to attend a certain school. Not only do tours give students an opportunity to learn more about a college itself, they also help them get a sense of the atmosphere of the school and help them decide if they would fit in there.

Junior Emily Wells said, “I’ve really loved going on college tours so far. I’ve learned and seen so much. It’s really helped me narrow down my college choices.”

Although individually visiting a college without booking a tour is a solid and beneficial method, registering for a tour through the college can provide a more inside look at the campus, as well as unique details about the school. They can be booked through colleges’ websites, and oftentimes include an informational seminar with staff members of the college, followed by a tour guided by students currently enrolled.

Usually lasting an hour or two, tours encompass many aspects, including an informational seminar, a guided tour, a questions and answers portion, and time for visitors to walk around and see the school individually. They allow students to see any and every part of a college, ranging from student hangout areas to lecture halls to cafeterias.

Most groups consist of around 10-30 people, allowing for a more guided and one-on-one personalized experience. This can be especially helpful for inquisitive and curious students who like to ask questions. College tours allow prospective students the opportunity to gain objective facts about the college, as well as a more personal experience.

Most college tours are free, making them not only useful put practical and financially viable. Oftentimes, along with the free tour is the optional choice to purchase food vouchers that allow touring students and families to eat at the school’s cafeteria, which provides another unique experience that allows students to become more familiar with the campus.

James Madison University is a beautiful campus that encompasses both urban aspects and the “classic campus” feel. A large public university, many students find JMU charming and the perfect distance away from home. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

James Madison University is a beautiful campus that encompasses both urban aspects and the “classic campus” feel. A large public university, many students find JMU charming and the perfect distance away from home. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Junior Megan Brown said, “Visiting colleges helped me visualize myself at the college and decide if it was the right one for me. I loved interacting with the students there and getting a feel of the atmosphere.”

Students are also shown stores where they can purchase spirit-wear, including sweatshirts, shirts, school supplies, and more.

Not only do guided tours give students the chance to interact with enrolled students to gain a new perspective when considering a college, but they also give them access to information unavailable anywhere else. For example, college tours oftentimes allow students to enter a mock room, furnished as an actual dorm would, letting students gauge the room’s size and quality for themselves.

Students can gauge a university’s facilities, student life, culture, academics, programs, and so much more, all in a single trip. However, repeat trips are recommended, especially when trying to decide between multiple colleges and zeroing in on a decision.

 

Glen Allen’s Annual Elective Fair

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Morgan Deckert

 

 

Notorious for having one of the most exciting booths, the Family and Consumer Sciences booth didn’t fail to impress again this year. The booth featured various class projects artfully arranged, as well as a food station further to the left. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Notorious for having one of the most exciting booths, the Family and Consumer Sciences booth didn’t fail to impress again this year. The booth featured various class projects artfully arranged, as well as a food station further to the left. Photo taken by Morgan Deckert.

As the 2016-2017 school year hit its halfway point, the discussion of selecting classes for the following year began. Counselors have started coming to classes to discuss elective options, teachers are making their recommendations, and students are compiling a rough draft of their schedule for next year. With so many electives to choose from and the pressure to decide as quickly as possible, it can sometimes seem like an overwhelming task to select classes.

Glen Allen’s elective fair has taken on the task of helping students through this transition period. On February 2nd during all three lunches, the cafeteria hosted the fair, which consisted of a number of booths spread throughout Commons A and B. Each booth advertised potential electives in order to show students what the class is about and give them information about each elective so deciding which ones to take is easier.

Since each booth offers a snapshot of the class, many elective classes go to great lengths to decorate their booths to display their most enjoyable and notable aspects.

This year, the marketing booth featured two student projects to display some of the most fun and creative aspects of the class. Informational flyers were also available for students to take. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

This year, the marketing booth featured two student projects to display some of the most fun and creative aspects of the class. Informational flyers were also available for students to take. Photo taken by Morgan Deckert.

Historically, one of the most elaborate booths belongs to the Family and Consumer Sciences classes, which all join together to make a single booth. Some of these classes include Creative Fashion, Food and Wellness, and Teachers for Tomorrow.

One of the biggest attractions at the booth this year was a station by Independent Living consisting of melted chocolate, vanilla wafers, and pretzels, which displayed first-hand one of the biggest aspects of the class: cooking.

Freshman Mary Kate West who currently takes the class and was manning the booth said, “I really like that Independent Living teaches economic aspects, as well as other things that will be extremely useful when I leave home.” She also said that her favorite parts of the class were projects and cooking, and she encourages any student to take it.

Closer to the exit doors were the band and art booths. The band’s booth displayed their website title on a large banner at the front of the booth and students were urged to look at it if they were leaning towards taking the class, and people were available to answer questions. The art booth was colorfully decorated and displayed many unique aspects, each meant to display the unique aspects of each individual art class.

Band teacher Mr. Hall ran this year’s band booth and was available to answer any questions inquiring students may have had. The booth displayed numerous past band trophies, as well as some band gear. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Band teacher Mr. Hall ran this year’s band booth and was available to answer any questions inquiring students may have had. The booth displayed numerous past band trophies, as well as some band gear. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Back towards the front of the commons were marketing, Journalism, and Yearbook. The marketing booth displayed a number of student projects and people were present to answer any possible questions. Journalism’s booth featured computers with the PawPrint website displayed for students to interact with, applications, and a video further explaining the class. Yearbook had copies of the yearbook, applications, and cameras present at their booth.

Also with them were Honors Humanities, Creative Writing, and Literary Magazine, combined to form a single booth. This booth was decorated with a typewriter, a bongo, feather pens, and many other decorations to show the unique and fun aspects of the class. A megaphone was also used to draw the attention of students. The quirky creativeness of the booth’s decorations and of those working it drew in many students.

Overall, according to students, this years’ fair was a success. Junior Alison Riley said, “I thought everything was really cool, and all the information was really useful.”

Exam Prep 101

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Morgan Deckert

 

 

Arguably one of the most stressful academic experiences in high school are taking tests. Requiring extensive preparation and holding significant influence over a students’ overall grade, tackling an exam can seem like an almost impossible task at times. However, there are many ways that students can better prepare themselves for a test and increase their chances of getting the grade they want.

Studying early is one of the most essential actions a student can take to prepare themselves. Many students procrastinate studying early for many reasons, such lack of motivation or not having enough time. However, not studying ahead of time leaves students at a disadvantage, as they are forced to scramble at the last minute to relearn things they may have forgotten and understand topics they do not understand. Starting review early not only helps the information stick better and longer, but also allows students to spread out their studying.

Junior Aaliyah Charania says that studying for tests during lunch has a positive impact on her grades. She thinks it is a great way to find time to study, especially since she oftentimes lacks time to do so after school. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Junior Aaliyah Charania says that studying for tests during lunch has a positive impact on her grades. She thinks it is a great way to find time to study, especially since she oftentimes lacks time to do so after school. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Getting enough sleep the night before is also extremely important. Although many students desperately scramble the night of exams to cram in every last bit of information, this can be a detrimental tactic that backfires. Not getting an adequate amount of sleep can result in students being tired while taking the test and, as a result, receive a low grade. Eating a good breakfast or lunch before the test can also help.

Finally, understanding what studying method works for you individually and trying and using a variety of them can hold great impact, as different students learn in different ways. A great way to do this is not only to try out different techniques yourself, but seek advice from other students about how they study and try out their methods.

Junior Amanda Truong says that her past notes are the most helpful thing to her when it comes to studying for midterms. “I look over all of them. Re-writing them also helps the information stick better. Flashcards are [also] a great way to review.”

On the topic, Senior Alyssa Roman said, “Writing out all of the equations you have memorized [for applying classes] is really important. Having someone quiz you and watching YouTube videos on the topics also helps.”

Junior Bryan Atanacio Ruiz suggests focusing on big picture items over little items. “I find it helpful to create an outline of general themes. Categorizing and learning the big picture can really help you get a grasp on the topic.”

 

Lewis Ginter Lights

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Morgan Deckert

 

 

Lewis Ginter held true to this year’s theme of “Living Color” by projecting a rainbow onto one of its most popular attractions, its treehouse. Rainbow lights were also strung along the ceiling of the inside. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Lewis Ginter held true to this year’s theme of “Living Color” by projecting a rainbow onto one of its most popular attractions, its treehouse. Rainbow lights were also strung along the ceiling of the inside. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is having its annual Dominion GardenFest of Lights, this year’s theme being “Living Color.” According to the Lewis Ginter website, the display urges those viewing it to explore “how the world’s kaleidoscope of colors speaks to us, impacts nature, and influences culture.” The display is open from 5p.m.-10p.m. until January 9th and tickets are $13 for adults and $8 for children age 3-12.

Along with the lights, Lewis Ginter offers different additional activities based on the day of the week. “Merry Mondays” offer storytime for younger children along with “Santa sightings.” “Caroling Tuesdays” offer holiday caroling from 6:30p.m.-8p.m., and “Crafty Wednesdays” come with children’s crafts. The week ends with “Musical Thursdays” where acoustic musicians perform from 6:00p.m. to 8:30p.m.

One of the most unique aspects about Lewis Ginter’s light display is that they incorporate more than just traditional lights. They put a unique twist on traditional lights by including other features, such as the assortment of glowing orbs that change color. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

One of the most unique aspects about Lewis Ginter’s light display is that they incorporate more than just traditional lights. They put a unique twist on traditional lights by including other features, such as the assortment of glowing orbs that change color. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

At the center of the garden is a large greenhouse visitors can stop at to get a break from the cold weather, as well as to see additional festive sights. Along with their usual displays of plants are rainbow lights hanging from the ceiling and a tall Christmas tree spray-painted rainbow to bring to life this year’s theme. There were also numerous extravagant train sets on display with small towns crafted in great detail surrounding them.

Outside, there are numerous pathways for visitors to take to view all parts of the garden, each covered in its own lights with its own unique style. Some sections featured animals crafted from lights, others flowers, and some just extravagant and colorful patterns.

A concession stand offered a number of refreshments, including hot chocolate, coffee, and lattes. Also available were an assortment of sweet treats, including whoopie pies, cookies, and gingerbread. S’mores were also available, a large fire not too far from the stand making the ideal spot to seek refuge from the cold while enjoying them.

Visitors are immediately given a taste of what is in store for the rest of the display upon entering the garden. The view from the main building immediately shows visitors fountains, the greenhouse, and some of its most elaborate displays. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Visitors are immediately given a taste of what is in store for the rest of the display upon entering the garden. The view from the main building immediately shows visitors fountains, the greenhouse, and some of its most elaborate displays. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Junior Emily Wells attended the GardenFest of Lights, and was thoroughly impressed by this year’s display. “It was a unique and family oriented experience that put a floral and colorful twist on a classic Christmas tradition,” she said.

Another person in attendance was Junior Darrah Davis. “The creativeness of the displays was amazing! I also liked that it offered a variety of activities for all different ages, so that I could go with my entire family and spend time with them because everyone found an activity that they enjoyed.”

To read more about the Dominion GardenFest of Lights and the Garden itself, as well as to see more pictures of the lights, go to http://www.lewisginter.org/.

One of the most charming aspects about the GardenFest of Lights is that, along with light displays, are interactive activities for visitors of all ages. Pictured here is one such activity, a maze made out of lights that appeals to all ages. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

One of the most charming aspects about the GardenFest of Lights is that, along with light displays, are interactive activities for visitors of all ages. Pictured here is one such activity, a maze made out of lights that appeals to all ages. Picture taken by Morgan Deckert.

Staff

Adviser: Melissa McLamb
Co-Editors: Elaina Coviello & Maggie Nuckols
Section Editors: Lauren Baugham & Morgan Deckert
Photography & Graphic Design: Bailey Steele
Social Networks: Jamison Crenshaw & Claire Bernard
HoGA: Emily Bickford & Oscar Gamez
Interactives/Monthly Flyer: Ashleigh Russo & Kelly Riggan
Writers: Kaylee Bagley, Cassie Coughlan, Paxton O'Brien, Sara Beth Stansberry, Brian Fadool, & Joshua Holtzman