5.6 Oceans

The student will investigate and understand characteristics of the ocean environment. Key concepts include:
a) geological characteristics (continental shelf, slope, rise);
b) physical characteristics (depth, salinity, major currents); and
c) biological characteristics (ecosystems).

Research Resources:
Sheppard Software – Ocean Zones, Deep Sea Strangers
Ocean Habitats
Plankton
Video: Secret Life of Plankton
Marine Food Web

STEM:

Tsunami!

Henrico 21 Lessons:
How is the Circulation and Behavior of a Fish Effected by Toxins in its Environment?
Oil Spill Problem Solving
Mapping the Ocean Floor

Design Briefs:
Can you hear it?  Ecolocation  Dolphins are one of the main species affected by bycatching. While dolphins can use echolocation to identify the location of many objects, they have difficulty identifying nets, and thus can be caught in them by accident. Students will learn how echolocation works, why certain animals use it to determine the size, shape, and distance of objects, and how humans can potentially take advantage of dolphins’ echolocation ability when developing bycatch avoidance methods. In this activity the students will experience a simulation of echolocation and use it to walk along a path while blindfolded.
Let Your Ears do the Walking Dolphins are one of the main species affected by bycatching. Dolphins use echolocation to identify the location of objects in the water, but they have difficulty identifying nets, and thus can be caught accidentally. Students will learn how echolocation works, why certain animals use it to determine the size, shape, and distance of objects, and how humans can potentially take advantage of dolphins’ echolocation ability when developing bycatch avoidance methods. In this activity the students will experience a simulation of echolocation and use it to walk along a path while blindfolded.
Map that Habitat Historically, sea floor mapping occurred with a more simple data collection method: soundings. Soundings are taken by dropping a weight with a pre-measured rope off the side of the boat and noting the measurement on the rope when the weight hits the bottom. This activity will replicate the creation of sea floor bathymetry by taking a simplified form of soundings in the classroom.