Archive For The “psychology” Category

The Culture of Education by Jerome Bruner :: A Book Review by Scott London

By | February 11, 2013

He says that there are four dominant models of pedagogy today. The first views the student as an imitative learner and focuses on passing on skills and “know-how” through example and demonstrative action. This approach emphasizes talent, skills, and expertise, rather than knowledge and action. The second views students as learning from didactic exposure. It is based on the idea that learners should be presented with facts, principles, and rules of action which are to be learned, remembered, and then applied. The third sees children as thinkers and focuses on the development of intersubjective interchange. This model revolves around how the child makes sense of his or her world. It stresses the value of discussion and collaboration. The fourth model views children as knowledgeable and stresses the management of “objective” knowledge. This perspective holds that teaching should help children grasp the distinction between personal knowledge, on the one hand, and “what is taken to be kn…

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The Culture of Education by Jerome Bruner :: A Book Review by Scott London

By | February 11, 2013

He says that there are four dominant models of pedagogy today. The first views the student as an imitative learner and focuses on passing on skills and “know-how” through example and demonstrative action. This approach emphasizes talent, skills, and expertise, rather than knowledge and action. The second views students as learning from didactic exposure. It is based on the idea that learners should be presented with facts, principles, and rules of action which are to be learned, remembered, and then applied. The third sees children as thinkers and focuses on the development of intersubjective interchange. This model revolves around how the child makes sense of his or her world. It stresses the value of discussion and collaboration. The fourth model views children as knowledgeable and stresses the management of “objective” knowledge. This perspective holds that teaching should help children grasp the distinction between personal knowledge, on the one hand, and “what is taken to be kn…

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Why are some doctors so emotionally distant? Maybe it’s the economy.

By | August 29, 2012

I've got a good doctor, and one of the reasons I like him as much as I do is his "bedside manner"—the shorthand we all use for describing whether or not medical professionals are able to connect with their patients emotionally. But pu…

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Research Shows That the Smarter People Are, the More Susceptible They Are to Cognitive Bias : The New Yorker

By | June 13, 2012

When people face an uncertain situation, they don’t carefully evaluate the information or look up relevant statistics. Instead, their decisions depend on a long list of mental shortcuts, which often lead them to make foolish decisions. These shortcut…

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What metrics-driven games have a hard time measuring

By | January 9, 2012

Raph Koster’s on a tear these days on the theory and practice of game design. Today, it’s a fab little sermonette on why it’s not right to sneer at data-driven, “free-to-play” games that use extensive instrumentation to make games that captivate playe…

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2011′s biggest scandals in science

By | December 19, 2011

The Scientist magazine has put out their list of the top science scandals of 2011. I’m not normally a huge fan of overblown scandal recaps, but this particular one is interesting, I think, because it gives laypeople a peek into some major stories tha…

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Why Angry Birds is So Addictive

By | November 4, 2011

In this analysis, usability expert Charles Mauro dissects the wildly successful game Angry Birds in order to explain why it’s so engaging — what factors in the game affect human cognition so that we’ll spend hours flinging virtual birds at virtu…

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Why we crave creativity but reject creative ideas

By | September 27, 2011

Most people view creativity as an asset — until they come across a creative idea. That’s because creativity not only reveals new perspectives; it promotes a sense of uncertainty.

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BBC News – ‘Wi-fi refugees’ shelter in West Virginia mountains

By | September 17, 2011

There are five billion mobile phone subscriptions worldwide and advances in wireless technology make it increasingly difficult to escape the influence of mobile devices. But while most Americans seem to embrace continuous connectivity, some believe it’…

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Do Grades As Incentives Work? | Psychology Today

By | June 13, 2011

So do grades-as-incentives work? Students brought up in a system of incentives get accustomed working for grades. So yes. It works for many students to motivate work. But if "working" means learning, these external incentives teach the studen…

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