Archive For The “twitter” Category

Hashtags of Inclusion

By | May 25, 2015

flickr photo shared by AndrewDallos under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-ND ) license I’ve been thinking a bit about how hashtags function on Twitter when used in course in particular. These thoughts are shaped mainly by seeing how #vizpoem, #curiouscolab, and #thoughtvectors have played out vs some of the other hashtags we’ve used like #vcualtlab… Read More

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My Twitter Evolution – Episode 1

By | May 17, 2015

I joined Twitter in November of 2007 which is roughly seven and half years ago. That’s a fairly long time and both my use and my thoughts about Twitter changed quite a bit over that time. Consider that Twitter only produced about 5,000 tweets a day back 1 then compared to 50 million a day… Read More

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Catfish Literacy?

By | April 29, 2015

To play off a bit of David’s post on social justice MOOCs, there seems to be a base need for tools for helping identify evil people on the web. That’s not in a dox type of way but more like a way to guide people in determining if accounts have ill intentions.1 That’s probably a… Read More

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Bike Race Fortunes Randomizer

By | April 19, 2015

Richmond is going to host this bike international bike race in a few months. The more interesting part, for me anyway, is going to be 25 one credit courses each using the energy and activity of the bike race to power a particular disciplinary/interdisciplinary exploration. In the meantime, we wanted to make a coming soon… Read More

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The Web is Plastic

By | July 20, 2014

Twitter really needs to seriously rethink the *mandatory* & unalterable displaying of images in one’s timeline on http://t.co/kklAvPC4K8 — Digital Maverick (@digitalmaverick) July 20, 2014 I saw the post above this morning and thought to myself that this is a problem I can solve. You can still bend and shape it to your desires, even […]

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Nonprogramistan Twitterbot Monstrosity

By | February 20, 2014

I wanted a Twitterbot to push out Markov generated stuff from Emily Dickinson’s work. I wanted to do it fairly quickly as it was inspired by an awesome discussion yesterday with Jason Coats who will be teaching one of VCU’s online courses this summer on poetry. One of his goals was to encourage students to […]

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Ambiguous Twitter Monitoring Leaves Athletic Departments Open to Embarrassment – Players – The Chronicle of Higher Education

By | November 6, 2013

Not the best article but some interesting ideas/research to explore.

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Ambiguous Twitter Monitoring Leaves Athletic Departments Open to Embarrassment – Players – The Chronicle of Higher Education

By | November 6, 2013

Not the best article but some interesting ideas/research to explore.

Read more »

Only the literary elite can afford not to tweet – SFGate

By | November 2, 2013

“Twitter has offered me an intellectual community I otherwise lack. It cuts the distance, both geographic and hierarchical. Not only can I talk with people in other places, but I can engage with people in different career stages as well. A sharp insight posted on Twitter is read, and RT’d (retweeted), with less regard for the tweeter’s resume (or gender or race) than it might be if uttered at, say, a networking event. Social media is a hedge against the white-shoe, old-boys’ networks of publishing. It is a democratizing force in the literary world.”

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Only the literary elite can afford not to tweet – SFGate

By | November 2, 2013

“Twitter has offered me an intellectual community I otherwise lack. It cuts the distance, both geographic and hierarchical. Not only can I talk with people in other places, but I can engage with people in different career stages as well. A sharp insight posted on Twitter is read, and RT’d (retweeted), with less regard for the tweeter’s resume (or gender or race) than it might be if uttered at, say, a networking event. Social media is a hedge against the white-shoe, old-boys’ networks of publishing. It is a democratizing force in the literary world.”

Read more »