Apr 15

Great Depression Photograph Archives

“During the Great Depression, The Farm Security Administration—Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) hired photographers to travel across America to document the poverty that gripped the nation, hoping to build support for New Deal programs being championed by F.D.R.’s administration.”

Original Source – Yale Launches an Archive of 170,000 Photographs Documenting the Great Depression | Open Culture Posted from Diigo via IFTTT

Immage Links to Photogrammar Database

Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

Great Depression

How to use in the classroom: 

Thinking about the quote that starts this post, it could be interesting to have students search the Photogrammar archive of Great Depression photos and then use one these photos to create an advertisement for specific new deal agencies that they choose or have been assigned.

Along with choosing their image, students would need to justify their choice of image by answering the following questions:

  • What were the goals of your New Deal agency?
  • Why do you intend to use this particular picture for your advertisement? How will it help to convey the meaning and/or goals of your agency?
  • What additional text and/or image(s) will you use to create your advertisement? Explain how these additions will strengthen your message and gain support for your agency.

 

 

Apr 15

Studs Terkel : Conversations with America

Original Source – Studs Terkel : Conversations with America Posted from Diigo via IFTTT

Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

Great Depression

How to use in the classroom: 

This archive, or any of the other historical interview database from the Great Depression, could lead perfectly into a lesson where students create their own research questions for the time period as if they were interviewing an individual who lived through the Depression. The students could research the answers to their questions and record an “interview” with that individual. You could even use some neat green-screen effects in order to bring the era to life.

Additionally, students could compare these interviews with interviews of individuals who were impacted by the recent recession in order to compare and contrast the two eras.

This database in particular (due to the number of interviews available) also lends itself well to an introduction activity to the unit. Assign each student one interview to read/listen to and have the students complete a graphic organizer for the “causes,” “effects,” and “government responses” for the Great Depression. After taking notes individually, students could combine these notes in a collaborative GoogleDoc for the entire class and discuss similarities/themes between the various interviews.

Apr 15

New Deal Project Map

Image Links to Interactive Map

Original Source – New Deal Project Map | Living New Deal Posted from Diigo via IFTTT

Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

Great Depression

How to use in the classroom: 

The teacher could use this interactive map to introduce the topic of the New Deal to his/her students. Before providing direct instruction on the New Deal, show students how to manipulate the data in the map via the search features and then ask students to discuss the following questions:

  • (Provide students with a list of the New Deal Agencies that they need to know).  After reading several entries for each agency, what do you believe was the purpose of this particular agency?
  • The agencies and programs discussed in this map are all a part of the FDR’s “New Deal.” Based on specific evidence from the map, what do you believe were the overall goals of the New Deal?
  • Where do you see the highest density of New Deal projects on the map? Why do you believe this is the case?

Possible Extensions:

This map could serve as a jumping off point for research on specific New Deal agencies and provide students with a local connection to the Great Depression and New Deal.

Apr 15

Oregon Trail Video Game

 

The Oregon Trail

Image Links to Game

 

Original Source – Oregon Trail, The : MECC : Free Streaming : Internet Archive Posted from Diigo via IFTTT

Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

Westward Expansion

How to use in the classroom: 

Play the “old school” version of the Oregon Trail video game! Students could use this game to answer the following questions:

  • What was the Oregon Trail?
  • Why did people move west during the mid 1800’s?
  • Describe the “trail life” experience.
  • What obstacles did people face when moving West?
  • Evaluate the pioneers’ decision to move West. Was it worth the effort and risk?
  • And most importantly…How many pounds of meat can my stick figure persona carry back to the wagon after a successful hunting outing?

Students could even answer these questions in first-person point of view by creating “diary entries” of a mid 19th century pioneer . The students could create this diary in a Google Earth virtual tour or use Google’s tour builder to get a sense of the Oregon’s Trail’s geography (similar to this resource/lesson idea).

Mar 09

Industrialization Image Comparison – Vocabulary Activity


Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

Industrialization

How to use in the classroom: 

This is a sample use for the tool, Juxtapose, which allows the user to compare/contrast two images by moving slider vertically or horizontally. This is a great tool for any activity where you want your students to compare similar before/after pictures or where overlaying two images could be useful for another instructional purpose, such as vocabulary instruction. The sample questions below could be used when teaching the word “industrialization” to your students:

  1. What comes to mind when you hear the word “industrialization?”
  2. Use the slider and write down everything you see in image 1.
  3. Use the slider and write down everything you see in image 2.
  4. Compare/contrast images 1 and 2. How are they similar/different?
  5. Which of these images do you believe best represents the word “industrialization?” Why?
  6. Based on your knowledge of the word and your experience with the two images, develop a definition for “industrialization.”

Mar 03

Temperance Map

Temperance Railroad Map

Image Links to Original Source – Library of Congress

 

“This 1908 map depicts the negative consequences of drinking and ungodliness, using an imaginary set of railroad lines, states, towns, and landmarks. The document was a conversion tool, meant for use by devout people hoping to win others to the path of righteousness.”

Original Source – Temperance map: Illustrating consequences of drinking Posted from Diigo via IFTTT

Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

Industrialization, Progressive Movement, 1920’s

How to use in the classroom: 

Have students analyze the map and provide specific evidence from the map to answer and discuss the following questions:

  1. Based on the evidence within the map, what do you think the word “temperance” means?
  2. What is the point/message that the author of the map is attempting to make? How do you know?
  3. Would the creator of this map have been in favor of the 18th/21st amendments? How do you know?

As an extension activity, students could research the effects of Prohibition and create their own “map” from the point of view of a supporter of the 21st amendment. To prepare the students for this task, ask the students to discuss the following question

  • “Using what you know about Prohibition and its effects on American society, how would a supporter of the 21st amendment respond to the message of this particular map?”

Several possible starting points for student research include:

Jan 21

World War I in Photos – The Atlantic

World War I in Images

Image Links Directly to Database

 

“One hundred years ago, in the summer of 1914, a series of events set off an unprecedented global conflict that ultimately claimed the lives of more than 16 million people, dramatically redrew the maps of Europe, and set the stage for the 20th Century.”

Original Source – World War I in Photos – The Atlantic Posted from Diigo via IFTTT

Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

World War I

How to use in the classroom: 

This resource provides a photographic overview of World War I. This particular site, along with others like it, could be used as an introductory activity for World War I and help a teacher model historical inquiry. A teacher could briefly scan through some of the images and captions and discuss his/her thought process with the class. For example:

  • A picture of a machine gun appears on screen:
    • “What effect did the machine gun have on warfare during World War I?”
    • Were there other technologies that had a large impact on the way the war was fought?
  • A picture of a man in a trench appears on screen:
    • Why did the trench system develop in World War I?
    • How did the trench system affect the way that the war was fought?

After modeling this thought process for the students, allow students to explore the overview on their own and develop their own questions. Students can then research the answers to these questions and present them to the rest of the class.

Jan 21

World War I Database

Random WWI Imagees

Image Links to Random Image Generator within the World War I Archive

 

“The National World War I Museum’s online collections database allows you to search digital records of our global collection that began in 1920.”

Original Source – Online Collections Database | National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial Posted from Diigo via IFTTT

Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

World War I

How to use in the classroom: 

This resource is a database of World War I sources, including original images, maps, and diary entries from the time period. I think the most interesting part of this particular archive is the random image generator that will pull 21 random items from the database and display these items on the screen. This particular tool could be used as an introductory activity for World War I and help a teacher model historical inquiry. A teacher could click the random image generator, briefly scan the documents that appear, and discuss his/her thought process with the class. For example:

  • A picture of a machine gun appears on screen:
    • “What effect did the machine gun have on warfare during World War I?”
    • Were there other technologies that had a large impact on the way the war was fought?
  • A picture of a man in a trench appears on screen:
    • Why did the trench system develop in World War I?
    • How did the trench system affect the way that the war was fought?

After modeling this thought process for the students, allow students to experiment with the random image generator and develop their own questions. Students can then research the answers to these questions and present them to the rest of the class.

Jan 20

World War I in Google Street View

Modern Day Photos

Image Links to Photo Database

 

“From British prisoners of war being marched through Bruges to anti-aircraft guns on the Eiffel Tower and new recruits in Toronto, our Street View specialist takes us back 100 years”

Original Source – First world war in Google Street View | Cities | The Guardian Posted from Diigo via IFTTT

Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

World War I

How to use in the classroom: 

Using this resource, and others like it (here’s another!), students can compare and contrast locations in today’s world with the exact same locations during World War I. I’m sure there are plenty of activities that lend themselves to this particular resource, but one in particular jumps out at me. Have students use these images to discuss “Why do many historians consider World War I to be the first “total war?””

 

Jan 20

How World World War I Reshaped Europe – Map

World War I Map

Image Links Directly to Interactive Map

 

“The Treaty of Versailles in 1919 was one of several to carve new countries from what remained of the pre-war empires.”

Original Source – How the first world war reshaped Europe: Redrawing the map | The Economist Posted from Diigo via IFTTT

Possible Unit(s) of Discussion:

World War I

How to use in the classroom: 

This map provides students with a slider that they can drag back and forth across a map of Europe. The slider changes the view of the map from 1914 to 1919. This map could be used at various points within a unit on World War I.

BEFORE teaching about World War I, you could have students use the map to discuss:

  • Based solely on the map, which countries do you believe won/lost World War I? Explain your answer with evidence from the map.

AFTER teaching about World War I, students could:

  • Participate in an activity in which they would “attempt to redraw the geographic boundaries of Europe in order to prevent a future World War.” Students could use the interactive to see how their solution compares to that of the Treaty of Versailles.

A video of these geographic shifts can be found here.

Additionally, this link provides students with a similar map that compares Europe in 1914 to Europe in 2014. Students could compare the previous map with this one to discuss:

  • How do the two maps compare?
  • Were there more or less changes in European boundaries between 1914-1919 or 1919-2014? Why do you believe this is the case?
  • What causes shifts and/or changes to geographic boundaries? (Students could use their knowledge from the World War I unit as well as research spurred by the modern day map to answer this question).