Senior Project Timeline

Senior Project Timeline

September 8, 2014
Students submit to the program coordinators a preliminary project proposal for three possible projects. Proposals due by 4:00 p.m. ABSOLUTELY NO LATE ENTRIES ACCEPTED.

September 15 – 19, 2014
Students are matched with advisors based on declared area of interest

September 22 – 26, 2014
Students, with guidance of advisors, select one of their three proposal topics.

Students meet with advisors to review project expectations; fine tune the individual project idea to meet those expectations.

Students, with the help of mentors and advisors, develop a formal letter of intent to submit to the Proposal Review Committee. This letter describes the project to be undertaken, information concerning the student’s prior knowledge/experience with this topic, and specific plans for acquiring the information necessary to complete the project. It is to be free of misspellings, typos, and grammatical errors Students whose letters of intent are not approved by the Proposal Review Committee will have ONE opportunity to re-submit. If the revised letter is rejected, the student is dropped from the project group.

Mandatory Annotation Workshop TBA

September 29, 2014
Final Project Proposal and Letter of Intent due to program coordinators by 4:00 p.m.

October – Through end of project
Students continue researching, begin journaling, and maintaining a worklog.

First week of October, 2014
Proposal Review Meets to assess proposals TBA

First week of October, 2014
Students receive a letter of acceptance or rejection from the Proposal Review Committee

October 6–10, 2014
Advisor signs off on journal, worklog, and 2 additional annotations.

October 10, 2014
Sign-off sheet due to program coordinators by 4:00 p.m.

3rd week of October, 2014
Mandatory Rubric Workshop TBA

4th week of October, 2014
Students, with the help of mentors and advisors, develop a rubric to be used by the mentor, the advisor, and the student as a part of the reflection/assessment.

October 27, 2013
Copy of Self-Assessment Rubric to program coordinators by 4:00 p.m.

November 3 – 7, 2014
Students meet with advisors for Journal and worklog check. Advisor will also sign off on two additional annotations.

November 7, 2014

Sign-off sheet due to program coordinators by 4:00 p.m.

November 21, 2014
Working topic research guide due to program coordinators by 4:00 p.m.

December 12, 2014
Interim progress report from mentor/advisor. Based on progress checks and work due since the Letter of Intent was approved, the mentor/advisor will determine if the student is on track for success or should be dropped from the project group.

2nd week of January, 2015
Students meet with advisors for Journal and worklog check. Advisors will also approve any additional annotations.

January 16, 2015

Sign-off sheet due to program coordinators by 4:00 p.m.

2nd week of February, 2015
Students meet with advisors to sign off on journal, worklog, and the completed draft of the Topic Research Guide containing 12+ annotations.

February 13, 2015
Sign-off due to program coordinators by 4:00 p.m.

2nd week of March, 2015
Students meet with advisors to outline and plan
1. Oral component of community sharing
2. Presentation to the Project Review Committee

March 13, 2015
Proof of Completed Product due to program coordinators by 4:00 p.m.

March 20, 2015
Mentor/advisor final reports AND completed worklog due to program coordinators by 4:00 p.m.

First week of April, 2015

Mandatory workshop on writing the reflective essay

2nd week of April (or sooner), 2015
Community Sharing Presentations

April 20, 2015
Final copy of reflective essay due to program coordinators
Students check their portfolios for completeness

April 29th 2015
Students present to the Project Review Committee

April 30th – May 1st 2015
Letters of the committee’s findings are sent to the students
Students receive the names and addresses of panel members for thank-you notes

School Counseling is notified re: seals on diplomas, honor cords, etc.

June 2015

Process begins with rising seniors

Resources

Senior Project Resources

Samples and Rubrics 

Brainstorming diagram

Preliminary project proposal form

Preliminary project proposal rubric (To be used be Senior Project Review Panel))

Final project proposal rubric (To be used be Senior Project Review Panel)

Self-assessment rubric – sample

Topic research guide rubric (to be used by Program Coordinators)

Journal entry – sample

Work log – sample

Final project proposal – sample

Annotated bibliography for final project proposal – sample

Preliminary timeline for final project proposal – sample

Letter of intent – sample

Senior Project Panel Rubric (To be used be Senior Project Review Panel)

Blank forms and Guidelines (PDF/DOC)


Preliminary project proposal form (DOC)

blank_final_project_proposal (DOC)

Letter of intent format guidelines (PDF)

Self-assessment rubric guidelines (PDF)

Self-assessment rubric – blank (DOC)

Rubric exercise (DOC)

Work log – blank (PDF)

Work log – blank (XLS)

Portfolio Checklist

reflective essay

Evaluating sources

Evaluating web pages: Techniques to apply & questions to ask (UC Berkeley Library)
This superb guide walks you through how to evaluate a web site critically before you decide whether to use it as a source for your project. Most of the page is organized into a two column table in which the left side suggests questions to ask as you review the site, and the right side explains why the answers matter.

Evaluating web sites (The Ohio State University Libraries)
Prefer something more visual? This helpful guide organizes the key elements of a web site evaluation (purpose, author, content, coverage, currency, and recognition) into a diagram and includes screenshots in the explanations of how to assess each element.

Distinguishing scholarly journals from other periodicals (Reference Department, Cornell University Library)
Confused by how to tell the difference between a scholarly article and one from a popular magazine? This straightforward explanation may help you feel more confident about your selections.

Writing annotations

How to prepare an annotated bibliography (Reference Department, Cornell University Library)
Includes examples in APA and MLA formats and clarifies the difference between the content of an abstract (summative) and an annotation (descriptive and evaluative).

How to write an annotated bibliography (University Library, University of California, Santa Cruz)
Provides sample annotations in complete sentence style and phrase style, and gives helpful guidelines about the type of information an annotation might contain.

Paraphrase: Write it in your own words (Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab)
Annotations should be in your own words, not just chunks of the source copied and pasted together. This site provides examples of acceptable and unacceptable attempts at paraphrasing and points out common pitfalls.

Citing sources

Noodle Tools

Other documents

Text of SP article from June 2006 parent newsletter (PDF)

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

1. May I work with a partner or group? No. The SP program is designed to enhance individual preparedness for college and work.

2. May one of my parents be my mentor? No. But they may recommend potential mentors they know through their work or community involvement. The mentor/student relationship that is part of the SP program is intended to emulate the relationship one might establish with a trusted professor or mentor/colleague in the professional environment.

3. May I switch my topic? It depends. If you switch your topic between June and September within the same area of interest, you should be fine. If your new topic is in a different area of interest, then there may be a delay in placing you with a new advisor. In either case, you will still be responsible for meeting all deadlines along with the other applicants. After your project has met the approval of the Proposal Review Committee, changing your topic is strongly discouraged because you would have to repeat all of the preliminary steps for your new topic and resubmit it for acceptance. If your new topic was approved, you would still have to remain on track with all of the deadlines your fellow program participants would be expected to meet.

4. If I don’t like my mentor/advisor, may I get a different one? On the preliminary project proposal form, you have an opportunity to recommend mentors with whom you would like to work. Please take the time to reflect carefully on these choices. Also, remember that both advisors and mentors are volunteers, and that one of the goals of the program is for you to develop a positive working relationship with your mentor/advisor. That being said, if there are extraordinary circumstances that occur, then you (speaking on your own behalf) may bring your concerns to the attention of the program coordinators.

5. Will I be given copies of the rubrics that the Proposal Review Committee and Project Review Board will be using? Yes. Not only will you be given copies, but your advisor/mentor will also discuss the rubrics with you to ensure that you understand the expectations.

6. May I start on the project during the summer? If you plan to get a head start on your project this summer, we strongly recommend that you meet with one of the program coordinators first. Particularly if your project involves viewing artwork in a certain museum or visiting a certain place, then it would be a good idea to do these things in the summer. The summer is also a wonderful time to research and plan your project. However, keep in mind that you are not guaranteed admission into the program and there is no early admission procedure. Therefore, make sure you document your work thoroughly.

7. Where may I go for help over the summer? Mrs. Smart will be in the Deep Run Library through June 17th. You will need to email her to reserve a time to meet. For assistance with finding quality resources, the public library is also an excellent resource.

8. May I make a poster as my end product? This is not a poster project. The end product you create for the SP program must represent substantial research and effort, and be professional in its quality. Remember, the project you propose for your SP should represent a minimum of 40 hours of work.

9. Does a Virginia Junior Academy of Science (VJAS) project or taking music lessons count? Remember that your SP project proposal must represent new learning for you, result in a substantial end product, and involve sharing your knowledge with the community and presenting it to the Project Review Board. A VJAS project may certainly serve as a springboard for an SP and taking music lessons to learn a new instrument or singing style may be one aspect of a project proposal, but taken alone they do not meet the requirements.

10. What if another student is interested in the same topic that I am? Interest in the same topic, such as the Harlem Renaissance or the Chesapeake Bay, may certainly be shared by more than one student; however, each project proposal must be distinct. When you create your preliminary project proposal, you must have a detailed plan to create a unique end product, as well as a way of sharing your knowledge with the community that fits your strengths and personality. Should two students submit similar proposals, the program coordinators will consult with the students and their advisors to revise their proposals so that they represent different aspects of the topic.

Writing Annotations

Writing Annotations

In order to complete your preliminary project proposal form, you will need to write at least SIX annotated citations, representing one print and one online resource related to each of the THREE ideas on your proposal form.

There are TWO parts to an annotated citation – (1) The citation itself which is formatted in MLA or APA format just as it would be for a Works Cited (MLA) or References (APA) page, and (2) An annotation written in your original words that provides an evaluative and summative description of the source.

In order to format the citation, It is recommended that you use Noodle Tools. If you do not have an account, contact a School Librarian for the password. When you write your annotation about each source, you should provide both a brief summary and evaluative comments about the source by answering the following questions in your own words:

1. Who is the providing the information in this source? What credentials do they have that make them a reliable source for information about this topic?

2. What type of information does the source provide? Give a sense of the topics and subtopics covered and the level of detail provided.

3. Who appears to be the target audience? Is this resource written for high school students? professionals in the field? elementary school students?

4. What other evaluative insights can you provide about the source that would be helpful for another researcher to know? For instance, is the source well-organized? difficult to use? does it have a bibliography that leads to other sources?

Resources about writing annotations

How to prepare an annotated bibliography (Reference Department, Cornell University Library)
Includes examples in APA and MLA formats and clarifies the difference between the content of an abstract (summative) and an annotation (descriptive and evaluative).

How to write an annotated bibliography (University Library, University of California, Santa Cruz)
Provides sample annotations in complete sentence style and phrase style, and gives helpful guidelines about the type of information an annotation might contain.

Paraphrase: Write it in your own words (Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab)
Annotations should be in your own words, not just chunks of the source copied and pasted together. This site provides examples of acceptable and unacceptable attempts at paraphrasing and points out common pitfalls.

Resources about evaluating sources

Evaluating web pages: Techniques to apply & questions to ask (UC Berkeley Library)
This superb guide walks you through how to evaluate a web site critically before you decide whether to use it as a source for your project. Most of the page is organized into a two column table in which the left side suggests questions to ask as you review the site, and the right side explains why the answers matter.

Evaluating web sites (The Ohio State University Libraries)
Prefer something more visual? This helpful guide organizes the key elements of a web site evaluation (purpose, author, content, coverage, currency, and recognition) into a diagram and includes screenshots in the explanations of how to assess each element.

Distinguishing scholarly journals from other periodicals (Reference Department, Cornell University Library)
Confused by how to tell the difference between a scholarly article and one from a popular magazine? This straightforward explanation may help you feel more confident about your selections.

Preliminary Proposal

SP Preliminary Proposal

Once you have selected an area of interest in which to focus your efforts, you need to come up with THREE possible project ideas within that area of interest. For each of these ideas, you need to do preliminary background research during which you identify and create an annotated citation for at least one valuable print resource and one valuable online resource about the research topic involved.

Some interested students have asked whether their THREE ideas may be drawn from more than one area of interest. This is acceptable; however, in this case, you should reflect carefully on which of the five areas of interest you circle because this indicates your FIRST CHOICE and the area in which we will search for an advisor to work with you. Should you elect a project idea within a different area in the fall, then there may be a delay in finding a new advisor for you, and you will still be responsible for meeting all the deadlines with the other potential program participants.

Your completed preliminary proposal must be submitted to a program coordinator no later than 4:00 p.m. on Monday, September 8, 2014 .

SAMPLE preliminary project proposal (PDF) – review this sample to make sure you complete your preliminary project proposal accurately and completely.

BLANK preliminary project proposal (Word)

For more tips about writing annotated citations, see the Writing Annotations section of the of the SP website.

Generating Ideas

Generating Ideas

Now that you’re interested in doing a SP, how do you decide what topic to research, what end product to create, and how to share your learning with the community? It’s time to do a little brainstorming and get those creative juices flowing. Start by getting out two clean sheets of paper, a pen or pencil, and five different colors of highlighters. Click HERE to see a sample of what your paper will look like after you complete steps 1-3.

Step ONE: Using a pen or pencil, list your responses to the following prompts around the outside edge of the paper (like a picture frame):

  • Which school subjects do you enjoy the most?
  • What are the most memorable projects or assignments you’ve completed?
  • What events, people, or topics you’ve studied in school (or heard about elsewhere) have left you curious to learn more about them?
  • What activities, teams, or clubs are you involved in (at Deep Run or outside of school)?
  • What else do you like to do with your time?
  • Think about elementary and middle school. What activities did you do? What subjects or topics interested you? What did you dream of being when you “grew up?
  • What skills would you like to learn that you haven’t had time to learn yet?
  • When you think about your future, what careers interest you the most?
  • What groups or individuals have you helped in the past by giving your time or sharing your knowledge/skills?
  • What do you think are your best qualities?
  • What do you wish you could improve about yourself?
  • What qualities do you admire in other people?
  • When you watch the news, which news reports upset and/or interest you?
  • Take a mental tour of the areas of Richmond you know. If you could change Richmond for the better, what would you change? If you could change your neighborhood for the better, what would you change?

Step TWO: In the middle of your paper, draw and label five circles to represent the five areas of interest for the SP and designate a highlighter color for each area:

Literature and history: encompasses topics related to studying writers, literary periods/movements, or particular literary works, as well as topics in world, American, or local history. The focus is on studying the past or literary style/technique through published works, historic documents, historic photographs, etc.

Social sciences: encompasses topics related to education, political science, sociology, anthropology, and criminology. The focus is on studying social institutions, social processes, and relationships between people.

Fine arts: encompasses the creation or study of people, movements, or works within the performing and visual arts.

Science and health: encompasses topics in all branches of life, physical and environmental science (biology, chemistry, physics, earth science, etc.) as well as topics related to physical and mental health, such as nutrition or pyschology.

Business, technology, and industrial science: encompasses topics related to mechanical, technical, and business skills, such as entrepreneurship, computer science, construction, manufacturing, restoration, and architecture.

Step THREE: Take a moment to review what type of research topics each of the five areas of interest encompasses. Then read through your list and color-code it so that the items related to each area of interest are highlighted in the color you chose to represent that area. For instance, if you used orange for your literature and history circle, then all items on your list in that area of interest should be highlighted in orange too. Some items may not fall into any of the five categories. That is o.k.

Step FOUR: Which color dominates your paper? Have some items you listed in that area or another area sparked a great idea for your SP? On the second sheet of paper, draw a circle representing the one or two most dominant areas of interest on your first page and/or the one(s) in which your best ideas are listed.

Step FIVE: In your own style (clustering, listing, etc.), reflect further on these areas of interest. Start with the items listed on your first page and build on that list, branching off to add ideas for end products or sharing related to certain topics.

What is Involved

What is involved?

In addition to creating a final product and sharing it with the community, there are several core requirements of every SP. The program coordinators maintain a portfolio of your SP in the library. You are responsible for ensuring that documentation of each component is submitted in a timely manner. You must meet deadlines and perform satisfactory work in order to remain in the program. For an overview of deadlines, see the SP timeline.

Preliminary project proposal: In this proposal, which you complete by September 8th of your Senior year, you select ONE of five areas of interest and generate ideas about three possible topics within that area of interest. For each of your three topics, you describe your tentative plans for the product you would create and the community action you would take. You also include annotated citations of two sources per topic (one print and one online) that you have consulted for your preliminary research, a completed questioning exercise for each topic, and a list of any potential mentors you have identified. Submitting a preliminary project proposal does not guarantee admittance into the SP program. The Project Review Board must approve your final project proposal for you to be accepted.

Final project proposal: In September, you work closely with your mentor and advisor to develop a final project proposal based on one of your topics. The proposal form requires you to cite resources you have consulted to develop your plan and identify others you plan to consult to learn more about your topic; explain to what extent the project requires you to learn new knowledge or skills; and describe the impact you expect your SP to have on the community. You also estimate the cost of the project and the amount of time it requires. When you reference the resources you consulted to develop your plan, you must cite a minimum of six, each with an annotation, two of which may be sources cited in your preliminary proposal. Your mentor, advisor, and a program coordinator provide you with feedback about your completed proposal. This feedback helps you refine your proposal and prepare the letter of intent that accompanies it for submission to the Project Review Committee.

Letter of intent: This is a formal letter that you write and submit to the Proposal Review Committee along with your final project proposal. The letter describes your SP in detail, explaining why you are interested in it; what you already know about it; how you plan to learn the additional knowledge and skills the project requires; what your final product will be; and what steps you will take to complete the project successfully. You also describe how you plan to share your knowledge with the school, and include a statement in which you acknowledge and pledge to adhere to the integrity expectations of the project. The Committee reviews your proposal. If they approve it, you become an official participant in the SP program and may proceed with your project. If they do not approve it, you have ONE opportunity to revise and resubmit it. If it is declined the second time, you are not admitted into the program.

Work log: In the work log, you document the time you spend on the project, along with a brief description of what you do in that time. Your mentor/advisor checks your log periodically to confirm that progress is being made relative to the time indicated on your log. Steady progress is essential to remaining in the SP program.

Journal: In your journal, you describe your step-by-step process, and reflect on your successes, challenges, and insights. Your mentor/advisor reviews the journal periodically. Thoughtful, substantial reflections are essential to remaining in the SP program.

Topic research guide: Your topic research guide serves as a record of the information trail you follow to learn about your topic and presents what you learn from your journey in a format that may be used by others who share your interest in this topic. It is a formal document which includes an overview of the research you conducted and an annotated bibliography of the sources you used (as well as other sources that could provide additional information for someone who might choose to use your guide as a starting point). Your research guide should include a minimum of twelve annotated citations, six of which may be ones you included on your preliminary and final proposal forms.

Product: The final product you create provides visual evidence of the knowledge and/or skills you gain in the process of completing the SP. It must be of sufficient complexity to demand a minimum of 40 hours of independent work, including research and sharing with the community. See details about the three formats from which you may choose for more information.

Mentor and advisor reports: Your mentor/advisor completes work log, journal and documentation checks in October and November. Along with the interim report in December, these progress checks determine whether you may remain in the SP program. If your progress is satisfactory, you may continue in the program. Your mentor/advisor then completes work log, journal, and documentation checks in January and February, and files a final report in March.

Student assessment and reflection: As part of your project planning, you develop a rubric with your mentor/advisor that reflects how you will judge your own performance on the SP. After you complete your SP, you write a reflective essay in which you assess your final product and the research that led to its creation based on this rubric.

Oral presentation and panel assessment: For the final assessment of your SP, you give a fifteen to twenty-minute oral presentation, including some type of audio-visual aid, to the Project Review Board. A five to ten-minute question and answer session with the panel follows the presentation. The mentor/advisor may assist you in preparing for the Q&A session by posing questions to you while you rehearse your presentation. Prior to the presentation, the program coordinators provide your SP portfolio to the Board. It is your responsibility to ensure that your portfolio is complete.

Is the Senior Project the Right Fit for You?

Is the Senior Project right for you?
If you are a rising senior who has maintained an average of a C or better in English 11 and passing grades in all your other courses, and your assistant principal verifies that you do not have any major discipline or attendance issues, you are eligible to participate.

In addition to these basic school requirements, ten individual characteristics that contribute to success on the SP are:

  • A passionate personal interest about something that can evolve into a project
  • The desire to have a positive impact in the community
  • A high degree of motivation
  • The self-discipline to work with minimal supervision
  • Good organizational skills
  • The openness to accept constructive feedback gracefully and the willingness to learn from it
  • The confidence to ask questions
  • The courage to take risks and persevere despite setbacks
  • A belief that your actions can make a difference in the world
  • Integrity

Still not sure if you’re ready? Schedule a meeting with a program coordinator to discuss your concerns.

Benefits

What’s in it for you?

Showcasing your talents
By demonstrating your individual talents and strengths, completing the SP gives you a chance to stand out from the crowd on college applications and scholarship essays.

Gearing up for life
The skills you strengthen through the SP process contribute to success at college or work by better equipping you to manage your time, develop long-range plans, turn ideas into meaningful products, conduct research efficiently and confidently, and use your voice, knowledge, and skills to improve your community.

Scholarship opportunities
Because the SP process involves networking and making contacts outside the school, it may lead to additional scholarship opportunities. It also gives a compelling subject to discuss on scholarship applications for which you are already qualified.

Community service points
Activities related to your SP that qualify as community service under HCPS guidelines (including completion of the required paperwork) may help you accumulate hours toward a community service seal on your diploma. If you are a member of a school service club, qualified activities may also count toward service credit for those clubs (this varies based on club policies).

School recognition
Completing all required components of the SP and meeting the expectations for evaluation results in school recognition and related benefits. Exceeding expectations translates into even more rewards.

  • Students who complete all required components and MEET the evaluative criteria for the SP are
    • Recognized at the senior awards assembly with a framed certificate in honor of their accomplishment
    • Awarded a commemorative seal on their diploma

 

  • Students who complete all required components and EXCEED  the evaluative criteria for the SP are
    • Awarded a framed certificate in recognition of their accomplishment
    • Recognized at the senior awards assembly with a framed certificate in honor of their accomplishment
    • Given a distinctive blue and black honor cord to wear at the graduation ceremony

Support

Support

You are not alone in the SP journey. You have an advisor/mentor to help guide you through the SP process, provide you with encouragement, advice, and constructive criticism, and remind you of deadlines. The program coordinators offer workshops throughout the year focused on skills that can contribute to your success, such as project management and public speaking skills. Each of these roles is described in more detail below.

Program coordinators
The School Librarians serve as the program coordinators for the SP. They develop the resources to guide you through the process, such as this website and the SP forms. They train advisors and mentors, maintain a portfolio of your work, and manage documentation connected with the SP process. They also organize workshops throughout the year that focus on skills relevant to successful completion of all or some SP formats, such as project management, research strategies, public speaking, interviewing, video/photo editing, etc.

Advisors
Advisors are faculty members at Deep Run who share your area of interest. Their role is to act as a link between the school and your mentor, provide you with feedback and advice, complete periodic progress checks of your work (including interim and final reports), and help you stay motivated and focused on completing the SP.

Mentors
Mentors are people (often from outside the school) who have expertise or experience relevant to your area of interest, preferably to your topic. Their role is to work with you as you develop your SP plan to ensure that it is realistic and complete, and that the project is likely to entail at least 40 hours of independent work. They suggest resources you may consult to learn about your topic, provide valuable input into the development of the rubric you use in your reflection essay to assess your final product, and give you advice and guidance when you have questions or confront challenges that may arise. Like advisors, they complete period progress checks of your work, including interim and final reports. If a Deep Run faculty member agrees to be your mentor, it is possible that you may not be assigned an additional faculty member as an advisor. Your parents and relatives may not serve as your mentor.

Parents
In addition to the support you receive from your advisor/mentor and the program coordinators, your parents/guardians are important members of your supporting cast. They can serve as valuable sounding boards for your ideas, help you identify potential mentors, and provide you with encouragement throughout the process. Both the preliminary and final project proposal forms require their signature to ensure that they are fully aware of your SP plans, the expectations you must meet to remain in the program and complete the SP, the consequences of not meeting expectations, and the benefits associated with various levels of performance.

Panel Assessment

Proposal Review Committee
The Proposal Review Committee reviews your letter of intent and final project proposal. Using a performance rubric, they determine whether the proposal meets the criteria necessary for acceptance into the program. If they find that the plan fails to meet expectations, they return it to you with their comments, and permit you ONE opportunity to revise and resubmit it by a specified deadline. If the SP proposal is found deficient upon a second review, you are not admitted into the program. You do not meet with this committee in person. They assess your SP proposal based on the documentation you submit.

Project Review Board
The Project Review Board assesses your completed SP. Using a performance rubric, they determine whether your SP meets or exceeds expectations. You make a formal presentation to them about your SP and they have an opportunity to ask you questions. In addition, they review your SP portfolio. It is your responsibility to ensure that your portfolio is complete. The rubric the Project Review Board uses to assess your SP includes performance criteria related to your final product, your community outreach, your topic research guide, your process, and your presentation. The board’s decision about whether your SP meets or exceeds expectations is final.

The SP requires creativity, skill, and commitment, and you should take great pride in having successfully completed the program. You reap many benefits for meeting expectations, and even more for exceeding them.