Noah Walls Holocaust Letter

Virginia Holocaust Museum

2000 East Cary Street

Richmond, VA 23223

January 3, 2015

 

Dear Marsha Kreuzman,

 

Hello Marsha. My name is Noah Walls and I work as a curator at the Holocaust museum located here in Richmond, Virginia. Here at the museum, we have been trying to extend research and we have actually located this picture at (http://tabletmag.com/scroll/158166/holocaust-survivor-meets-u-s-soldier-who-liberated-her). We have noticed the similarity between your story, article, and what is happening in the picture and we would really like to talk to you about your experience and how it relates to the picture we found. Also we would love to continue our research with the soldier you talk about in your incredible story.

 

In your story, you describe the liberation of you and your fellow inmates at the harsh concentration camp, Mauthausan. You describe how you fainted when you heard the words “You’re free”. The news must have struck you extremely hard. In the picture, the inmates faces are similarly lighten up with smiles and they are actually tipping their hats to the soldiers. I couldn’t imagine the joy you felt when you saw the soldiers. Also your story tells us how you reconnected with one of the soldiers that liberated you. I bet he is just as excited about talking to you as you are about talking to him. This would make for an amazing story at our museum.

 

As we are trying to bring more exciting stories to our museum, I would love to ask you a few questions. How long did it take you to recover from being so emaciated from being kept in the camps? Also, did you and the inmates believe you were going to get liberated before it happened or did you guys lose hope after years? You talk about how you reconnected with one of the soldiers that liberated you. What emotions did you have when you first talked to him? I could only imagine the emotions you felt talking to the man who saved your life after many years of disconnection.

 

Thank you for helping us bring more incredible stories to our museum. I look forward to your reply and more of your great stories.

 

Sincerely,

 

Noah Walls

 

(Link to Story: http://tabletmag.com/scroll/158166/holocaust-survivor-meets-u-s-soldier-who-liberated-her)

Bryant Steggall Survivor Letter

Dear Joesph Sher,

My name is Bryant Steggall, and I am a curator at the Virginia Holocaust Museum, in Richmond, Virginia.  I was looking through old photos and researching the photos, I found that your story relates to a picture. I read your story on line (http://www.holocaustsurvivors.org), and could use your help to gather more information for our exhibit?

The picture I was looking at had four men digging a hill near an old village.  Two men faced towards the camera did not look very happy to be holding a shovel at all.  You said in your story that you had to cut down trees, dig trenches, and dig hills, and that appears to be what they are doing in the picture.  The age range in the picture appears to be between 25 and 70 years old.  In the picture, they looked very tired and stressed out, and looked like they needed to take a long nap.

I was wondering if the Virginia Holocaust Museum and I can use your story in our new exhibit so we can tell the stories of survivors during this horrible time frame.  It would be wonderful if you can share some more of your experience for the tourists of the museum!  How many men would dig at the same time?  And for how long at a time would you guys get a break?  Thanks so much!

Bryant Steggall

http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/exhibitions/this_month/october/08.asp

Brittney Dintaman Survivor Letter

Dear Jeannine Burk,

My name is Brittney Dintaman, and I am the curator at the Virginia Holocaust Museum, in Richmond, Virginia. I was looking through old photos and researching the photos, I have discovered that your story relates to the picture. I read your story on line (http://www.holocaustsurvivors.org), I noticed some similarities from your story to this picture and could use your help to gather more information for our exhibit.

The picture that I was looking at was taken in Nuremberg, Germany. In this picture it shows mean and women who look like they are outside on the street. There are about 5 women and 5 men, they are holding their hands up and their fingers are all together. Some of the people look happy and some of them look surprised in a bad way. Not only are there just men and women but there is also a little boy who is there also. In your story you say how the house that you were staying at, the lady who hide you in the outhouse when Hitler and the Nazis would parade in the streets. In this picture it seems like that is what is happening. All of the people in the picture are wearing sort of nice clothes and they are all leaning up against a fence.

I was wondering if the Virginia Holocaust Museum and I can use your story in our new exhibit so we can tell the stories of survivors of this terrible event in history.  If yes, Could you answer a few questions for me about this event? In your story you said how people would stand out on the streets when Hitler came by, why did they do that? Also you said how you would like to watch the people, did you see them doing this hand motion when he came by? And did the family that hid with ever do this hand motion, and what does it mean? Thank you for sharing your story with me.

 

Thanks,

Brittney Dintaman

Link to Picture:

Lauren Weber Survivor Letter

Virginia Holocaust Museum

2000 East Cary Street

Richmond, VA 23223

12/3/14

Dear Shep Zitler:

Hello, my name is Lauren Weber and I work at the Virginia Holocaust Museum in Richmond. I am writing to you about your story and a photo I found. My museum has been receiving photos from the Holocaust time and I placed my eyes on a certain one. I found a photo of a group of male soldiers and in your story I read you were a soldier and a prisoner of war. It looks like the picture I found and your story have a connection. I could really use your help with helping me understand more about this photograph.

In your story I read about how you were drafted into the Polish army. That must have been hard being away from everyone and being forced to do it. The photo I found is a group of soldiers in Poland after the invasion there. Your story talks about being in the same invasion in Poland. I am writing to you because both your story and the photo I found are the same time period and very similar to each other.

Since I am from Virginia Holocaust museum I am wondering if I could possibly use your story in our exhibit so you can share with others what you went through. If you are fine with this I would love for you to write back to me because I have lots of questions. I read that you were starved and many of your family members were dying. Why did you want to keep going? How did you get through each day not knowing what would happen next? I have more questions so please get back to me if you can.

Thank you so much for letting me read your story and I am hoping to hear back from you. I hope you are doing okay and let’s hope that awful time period will never come back again.

Sincerely,

Lauren Weber

Link to Photo- http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005070