Tag Archive | "art history"

The Pilgrimage: A Field Guide to Art History




Summary

The Pilgrimage is a journey for students and teachers alike; exploring and compiling art historical information in a scientific way that initiates discovery and excitement. What could be more motivating than learning about great story and passing it on to others?

The aim of this lesson is to untangle the sociological, political, religious and personal factors behind art and organize them in a manageable format similar to field guides in science. This method was chosen to deepen observational skills. Critical thinking is required to make connections and comparisons.

Students use higher order thinking skills: organizing, deconstructing, explaining and producing to ultimately create a field guide book and e-book to help others in identifying art and aid in the understanding of history and the contemporary world around them.

 

TIPC Ratings

Approaching: Because the instructor guides students through the process of categorizing and organizing in a manner indicative of a Field Guide. The teacher aids students in understanding the importance of research and challenges them to share in the painstaking process researchers take to compile and publish reliable information.  The assignment provides the students an opportunity to develop a real-world application with a final product. This is used not only to promote the arts in education but in the understanding and of other disciplines demonstrated through a cross-curricular approach. The teacher supports students, by moving around the room, as they acquire their information and help to direct them in evaluating whether to include it in our book. Students use the internet to conduct their research but determine on their own the validity of the information and sources through comparisons. Other research tools were given.

Approaching: Because students collaborated in peer groups to research and create the strategy and details of a Field Guide book. The students used advanced technologies, such as Adobe CS, to create original and purposeful work. Students sorted through published expert field guides and collaboratively critiqued historical content, layout and design as well as each other. It is the ultimate collaboration to take five different art classes consisting of 150 students and create a single book. This lesson goes beyond the classroom in that students are communicating to a world audience with their dissection of Art History in a formal scientific manner.  This approach is somewhat unusual for an art historian, I even dare to say, new. The information, regardless of time or distance, will ultimately reach the hands hundreds, perhaps someday thousands of people via a published book, e-book and eventually smartphone app. These students are not only communicating presently but will continue to do so across time and boundaries through both old and new technologies.

 

Ideal/ Target: Students were engaged in an environment with meaningful questioning strategies. This project encourages the exploration of scientific procedures and how to apply them to other aspects of their learning. Students were responsible for judging and evaluating their own research sources throughout the entire project.  Connections with the past and present were made and through technology and those associations were created and presented.  Students were challenged to reflect on their product, their process, as well as those of their peers. High order thinking such as synthesis, analysis and evaluation were required to develop a complete guide to art history. The final product was authentic, meaningful, creative, and useful.

Ideal/Target: Because the teacher facilitated an environment where students were engaged in the creation of an innovative new project.  Creativity was abundant in the design, layout and publication of their book. Students experimented with various techniques based on current trends and were prompted by them to move beyond the classroom and take the project “viral”. Outside the parameters of the assignment students are currently looking into publishing our guide as an e-book and app development. The students were engaged in higher order thinking synthesizing the information to compose, design, create and produce a book. Furthermore, students were required to figure out how to work with 150 of their classmates to coordinate and ensure that all outcomes were successful. Throughout the process student suggestions were recommended such as various research techniques, scientific studies and technological applications and student solutions were implemented for example layout changes, design ideas and sharing of information.  Additionally, the students created an innovative product that has value for a variety of specified audiences.

Student Artifact

studentsworking

Posted in Comm/Collab - App, Creativity - Target, Critical Thinking - Target, High School, Info Fluency - App, ProjectComments (0)

Six Degrees of Separation from Ancient to Renaissance Art Review



Submitted by: Jonathan Gregori
School: J.R. Tucker High School

Summary

As a means of reviewing previous art periods and making connections with the current content being covered, as well as encouraging self-exploration, students are to create a six degrees of separation in Art History presentation. Students are to choose an artist from the Renaissance Art period (currently being studied in class), find a signature piece from that artist, critique the work and identify an artistic theme portrayed. The students then will use the concept of six degrees of separation between any two humans to connect their chosen work’s theme from the Renaissance back through the art history of the Middle Ages, the Roman Empire, the Ancient Aegean, Egypt and the Ancient Near East. For each art period, the student will select an artwork that shares the theme, research the artist and art period styles. These six artworks, artist and art period information will be used in a classroom presentation as a means of review of the content studied to this point in the year. Each student chooses a theme and creates their own six degrees of separation thread, but also has the opportunity to collaborate separately with up to 6 other students in the class, by sharing a common artwork from a time period. Students are to select the best means of presenting the information to the class. Students viewing the presentation will complete a peer review and record important information using a googledocs form during the presentations. All presentation will be presented and stored in a manner as to make them accessible outside of the classroom.

TIPC Ratings

Research and Information Fluency:

APPROACHING: Students are to choose an artist from the Renaissance Art period, find a signature piece from that artist, critique the work, and identify an artistic theme portrayed. Next, they will assemble art history research using a variety of web based resources and include full and complete citations. Students will synthesize and apply their knowledge to connect their artwork to another form of art with a similar theme – going back through five previous art periods (Renaissance, Middle Ages, Roman Empire, Ancient Aegean, Egypt, and Ancient Near East). Then they will choose the most appropriate tool to display and interact with the information. Subsequently, students will generate an authentic review tool for other students.

Communication and Collaboration:

APPROACHING: Students have the opportunity to collaborate with up to 6 other students. The students will choose a digital tool to facilitate collaboration such as web based digital presentation tools like Prezi or Dipity (interactive timeline) which allow collaborative editing from outside the classroom. Each student will present their project to the class, while the remaining students complete a peer review using a GoogleDoc form.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving:

TARGET: Students must use higher level critical thinking skills to analyze and identify a common thread/theme throughout the art history. Then they have to apply their knowledge to connect their artwork to another form of art with a similar theme of a previous art period, six times – the Six Degrees of Separation. The students will choose a digital tool that best allows them to display their research findings in an interesting and accessible way. The students receive immediate teacher and peer evaluations that allow them to reflect on their critical thinking for future growth.

Creativity and Innovation:

TARGET: The students use their knowledge gained through research to creatively connect their thematic artwork to another piece from another art period. They have the freedom to take a strategic risk by choosing the presentation tool, including being awarded higher marks for using a digital presentation tool unknown to the teacher, which supports innovation. This also allows students to use their creative talents to display their six degrees of separation works of art in a Glogster, Prezi, Dippity, etc. Consequently, the students use existing artworks collected under a self-generated theme to create a valued teaching and review tool within and beyond the assignment. Immediate feedback through a GoogleDoc peer assessment allows students to reflect and set goals for future growth.

Student Artifact

Download Files

H21_1112
Contents:

  • Lesson Plan

Posted in Art, Comm/Collab - App, Creativity - Target, Critical Thinking - Target, High School, Info Fluency - AppComments (0)

Virtual Art Museums



Submitted by: Alison Owens
Target Grade/ Subject: 8th Grade Art
Collaborators: Joy McDonald, ITRT
School: Hungary Creek Middle

Summary

Students use SketchUp to build a 3D museum that contains both their own work over the semester and the artists throughout history that inspired their work. This is the culminating project in a 5 class lesson plan that contains a variety of additional activities.

TIPC Ratings

This lesson falls solidly in the Developing level of the TIP Chart in Research and Information Fluency. Students research artists and use a variety of resources. Adding a focus on student question development, evaluating resources, and using multiple sources would increase the rating for this strand.

Students work in groups to create their three dimensional museum model using Sketchup. Communication within the classroom to create this model is aligned with the qualities of the Developing level of of Communication/Collaboration strand.

Scoring in the Ideal/Target level of the Critical Thinking strand of the TIP Chart, this lesson calls on students to combine their research, art skills, and technology skills into designing a real-world project. The questions involved in designing a 3D building to display art brings into play a number of open ended questions.

This project scores solidly in the Approaching level of the Creativity strand of the TIP Chart. It has students apply their existing knowledge to create products. If the students collaborated with an outside audience this strand would move into the ideal category. That could be done by inviting conversations with outside experts or working with other students from outside their classroom.

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Contents:

  • Lesson plan
  • Project rubric
  • Student Directions
  • Student Sample

Posted in Art, Comm/Collab - Dev, Creativity - App, Critical Thinking - Target, Electives, Grade Level, High School, Info Fluency - Dev, Middle School, Subject, Winner '09-'10, WinnersComments (0)

What if? Claymation Project



Submitted by: Patricia Harris
School: Longdale Elementary School

Summary

Students create a claymation movie about the life of a famous artist that answers the question “What If…?” After researching their assigned artist, groups decide on an alternate path for an artist and showcase that through the claymation movie. This lesson is strong in creativity and innovation.

TIPC Ratings

This lesson falls in the Developing level on the TIP Chart for Research and Information Fluency. In this lesson, students do basic research on their artist and are given direct instruction on how to use the information. The teacher could raise this level by allowing students to select their own digital tools to assemble, evaluate, and utilize information.


This lesson exhibits qualities consistent with those of Approaching on the TIP Chart. Students effectively communicate and collaborate in teams to create original works. Each student takes on a specific role in the team to impact how they contribute to the final product.

As it is, this lesson is in the Developing level of the TIP Chart for Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Students answer the open-ended question “What if…?” in their movie by using higher order thinking skills. To raise the level, consider technologies to support the level of thinking.


This lesson lands in the Approaching level of the TIPC Chart. Students apply critical thinking and research methods to create their claymation movie. They also collaborate to create the movie.

Download Files


Contents:

  • Lesson Plan
  • Student Examples

Posted in Art, Comm/Collab - App, Creativity - App, Critical Thinking - Dev, Electives, Elementary School, Grade Level, Info Fluency - Dev, Subject, Winner '09-'10Comments (0)

Virtual Art Museums




Summary

Students use SketchUp to build a 3D museum that contains both their own work over the semester and the artists throughout history that inspired their work. This is the culminating project in a 5 class lesson plan that contains a variety of additional activities.

Essential Questions

  • How does art reflect and impact history?
  • How does the color wheel impact color choice?
  • What impact does the museum have in the display or art?

TIPC Ratings


Students will research artists and use a variety of resources. Adding a focus on student question development, evaluating resources, and using multiple sources would increase the rating for this strand.


Students are working in groups to create their three dimensional museum model.


This lesson calls on students to combine their research, art skills, and technology skills into designing a real-world project. The questions involved in designing a 3D building to display art brings into play a number of open ended questions.


This project has students apply their existing knowledge to create products. If the students collaborated with an outside audience this strand would move into the ideal category. That could be done by inviting conversations with outside experts or working with other students from outside their classroom.

Download Files


Contents:

  • Lesson plan
  • Project rubric

public domain licensed photo shared by the Library of Congress

Posted in Art, Electives, Grade Level, High School, Middle School, Winner '09-'10Comments (2)


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